World Cultures Fall

VPA 311: WORLD CULTURES:   Fall 2016
ARTS 240;  Monday, 5:30-8:15 p.m.
READER: Natalie Adamson
adams126@cougars.csusm.edu

Office hours: Tuesday 2:30-5:30, or by appointment; Arts Building 331;  760-750-4151
Email: dsmall@csusm.edu
Deborah Small Blog

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In World Cultures, we will explore contemporary world cultural practices ranging from indigenous expressions to new electronic forms in a global and multi-disciplinary context. The class consists of readings, discussions, lectures, videos, visiting artists, writing, quizzes, and attending arts events.

World Cultures will focus on cultural dissemination, dispersion, Diaspora, migration, and exchange. We will look at art that is colonialist as well as anti-colonialist in its assumptions about the world. We will question how cultural practices act as oppositional and critical forces.

The works we will study often incorporate a variety of diverse cultural influences, a reflection of artists’ cultural identities and societies as multiple rather than singular, shifting rather than stable, products of colonization as well as anti-colonial struggles.

We will examine who has the power to creates frameworks for understanding, interpreting, and evaluating cultural practices.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
By analyzing films, reading selected texts, engaging with guest artists, attending lectures, and attending outside art events, you will:
1. Explore the meaning of artistic expression about relevant social, political, and cultural issues of our time.
2. Understand how world cultures have been diminished, and explore global efforts at revitalization of those cultures
3. Explore the role of folk arts and grassroots movements in the arts and syncretism in cultural practices.
4. Explore cultural practices that offer transformative paradigms for social engagement and creativity: art that celebrates what it means to be human in an increasingly globalized culture.
5. Examine the extent to which art practices are oppositional and critical and/or reproduce conventional assumptions about the world and reinforce cultural hegemony.

ART EVENTS: You are required to attend a screening of one of the full-length feature films at the San Diego American Indian Film Festival, November 19-21, which takes place on our campus and at Pechanga. You are also required to see the current exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Downtown. More about both of these later in the semester.

WRITING: All writing is on your blog site. 
1. A minimum of two paragraph response to the films that are required as homework each week for the class. In your first person narrative, you should comment on whatever is most significant for you, what will you remember about the film a year from now, how did it inspire you (or not). I am interested in your reaction to the film, your analysis of why it was moving, compelling, boring, redundant, exciting for you, and why. I will evaluate the overall thoughtfulness and quality of your blog responses. VERY IMPORTANT: Your blog post title should be the name of the film.
You will also post a:
2. 250 word (equivalent of one page) write-up of one of the films from the San Diego American Indian Film Festival in November,.It would be great for you to include photos of the events, and cell-phone photos are fine. Again your response should be a first person narrative about the significance of the film and the event for you.

ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING
80%
5 Quizzes throughout the semester on videos, readings, and lectures; 
I will count your top 4 quizzes, but quizzes will be cumulative, so make sure that you borrow notes from someone if you miss a class and that you do all the reading and film assignments. The last quiz is the FINAL, and EVERYONE TAKES THE FINAL QUIZ/FINAL #5.
NO MAKE-UP QUIZZES NO EXCEPTIONS: that’s why I’m taking the top 4.
20%: Blog


SYLLABUS
This syllabus is provisional. We will have wonderful guests coming to our class, but there will be changes. Please check the website every week for your homework assignment and to note any updates to incorporate relevant materials. Our guests coming this semester  include: Mike Wilken, anthropologist; Bill Bradbury and Gunner Biggs, Mando Basso musicians; a Latin Jazz Trio, Chicano artist David Avalos, and Dancer Karen Schaffman, among others. They are in the process of giving me their dates.

ANNOUNCE:
1. San Diego American Indian Film Festival, CSUSM, Nov 17-19
REQUIRED: attend one full-length film

2. MCASD Downtown: Exhibition: must visit by 9-26 class
a. DeLIMITations: In 2014, artists Marcos Ramírez ERRE and David Taylor set out to trace the historical 1821 border between Mexico and the western territories of the United States. That border stretched from the present-day Oregon/California state line to the Gulf of Mexico just west of Louisiana, and previously existed only as a reference on historic maps and treaty documents because it had never been surveyed or physically marked. For DeLIMITations, ERRE and Taylor asked the question, “what would Mexico and the United States look like if that boundary had been fully realized?” ERRE and Taylor, accompanied by filmmaker José Inerzia, who helped document the process, drove a van outfitted to serve as a mobile command center, fabrication space, and camper along the 1821 border. The artists marked the boundary by installing 47 sheet metal markers that mimic the stone and iron obelisks that delineate the current international border between the United States and Mexico.

DeLIMITations: A Survey of the 1821 United States-Mexico Border is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, with generous lead underwriting support from Paul and Geneviève Jacobs. Additional support has been provided by proceeds from the 2016 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

b.
 watching, waiting, commiserating
Ruben Ochoa makes use of common construction materials to create imposing sculptural installations that intervene into the existing built environment. His sculptures—in addition to his drawings, photography, and public projects—move beyond the materials’ direct references to construction and labor in order to generate new associations between aesthetics, architecture, and class.

Part of a generation of Mexican-American artists who are engaging in new approaches to identity and cultural politics, Ochoa lays claim to conceptual and minimal art practices from the 1960s and ‘70s. As playful as it is dynamic, his large-scale installation watching, waiting, commiserating was commissioned by MCASD in 2010 as a response to the expansive Farrell Gallery. Consisting of numerous individual sculptures made of rebar and elevated shipping pallets, the work repurposes the infrastructure of the built environment, creating a space where labor is both literally enacted and abstractly referenced.

Ruben Ochoa: watching, waiting, commiserating is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, with generous lead underwriting support from Paul and Geneviève Jacobs. Additional support has been provided by proceeds from the 2016 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.




WEEK 1   08-29
Art, Inspiration, Influence
INTRODUCTION: to class and attendance
DISCUSS: First Person Voice and blogs for the class: student Blog from previous semester:
Armando Madrigal: we looked at this blog post in class

Ashley Andruski: we looked at this blog post in class

Jonathan Sharp

Melissa Mandim

Itzel Espejo

You will access film for the class assignments from the Cougar Course container; Netflix streaming; renting from Amazon, iTunes, etc.

DISCUSS: World Cultures: Think about what we all have in common, and what language is: Wade Davis, cultural anthropologist:
 “We all share the same adaptive imperatives. We’re all born. We all bring our children into the world. We go through initiation rites. We have to deal with the inexorable separation of death . . . we all sing. We all dance. We all have art. What’s interesting is the unique cadence of the song, the rhythm of the dance in every culture. . .” This are our commonality. This is our humanity.
Why study other cultures: to learn that they’re are “other ways of being, other ways of thinking, other ways of orienting yourself to the earth.”

“A language is not just a body of vocabulary, or a set of grammatical rules. A language is a flash of the human spirit . . . Every language is an old growth forest of the mind, a watershed of thought, an entire ecosystem of spiritual possibilities.” 

We will look at many kinds of languages, not only spoken language, but the language of the body, the language of improvisation, the language of plants, of trees . . .

SCREEN:
Pedro Reyes: Disarm
The Creators Project

Ed Ou: photojounalist: A Large Disconnect, Arab Youth

Jose Parla

Jose Parla interview: Writing “street artist/painter as anthropologist
Parlá’s markings echo the distressed surfaces of the walls he inscribes, and offer commentary on the lives of Cuba’s elders; together, JR and Parlá’s murals marvelously animate a city whose walls are otherwise adorned only by images of its leaders.”—from JR’s website

Wrinkles of the City
In May 2012, JR collaborates with Cuban-American artist José Parlá on the latest iteration of The Wrinkles of the City: a huge mural installation in Havana, undertaken for the Havana Biennale, for which JR and Parlá photographed and recorded 25 senior citizens who had lived through the Cuban revolution, creating portraits which Parlá, who is of Cuban descent, interlaced with palimpsestic calligraphic writings and paintings.

HOMEWORK:
1. CREATE: your blog at wordpress.com
VERY IMPORTANT 
your blog address:
firstnamelastname.wordpress.com
For example: deborahsmall.wordpress.com
Title of your blog should contain your name as well: for example, mine is:
Deborah Small’s Ethnobotany Blog

2. BLOG POSTS: you will do your first blog post for next week as a
First Person Narration:  remember the blogs we looked at in class, and there are 3 more we didn’t have time to read. They are linked above if you want to read them.
Armando Madrigal: we looked at this blog post in class

Ashley Andruski: we looked at this blog post in class

Jonathan Sharp

Melissa Mandim

Itzel Espejo

WATCH & POST
1. Rent: Art21 Season1 Buy Episode 1 SD $1.99 on Amazon.com:
Watch Sally Mann, Pepón Osorio, Barry McGee & Margaret Kilgallen

2. JR on Ted Talks 2011
3. JR on Ted Talks 2012

4. Read: “DeLIMITations,” by Robert Pincus

Write your post on ONE of the artists:
Either JR. Sally Mann, Pepón Osorio, Barry McGee, or Margaret Kilgallen
Read “DeLIMITations,” but you do not need to post about it yet


WEEK 2   09-05 LABOR DAY
HOMEWORK: WATCH & POST
1. Waste Land, with Brazilian artist Vik Muniz:
$2.99 on iTunes
; Free on Hulu with Free Trial; DVD queue on Netflix; this is now available in the VPA 311 Cougar Course Container

2. POSTS for WEEK 1 + WEEK 2 due by 5:30 pm for CLASS on 09-12


WEEK 3   09-12 ALL POSTS DUE SUNDAY by 11:59 PM, at the very latest: try to post much earlier to insure that your post in on time

Class posts: just a few of the amazing posts for Week 1 and Week 2 from students who posted early:
Natalie Adamson

Tessa Mata: Wasteland

Ashley Clingingsmith

Declan Deveze

Anne Decker

Eric Griffin JR

Reinhard Victa: Margaret Kilgallen

FILL OUT: Waivers for class fieldtrips
DISCUSS:
1. Assignment of MCASD, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Downtown, as homework for 09-26 class: check out the website, and CALL AHEAD FOR PARKING INFORMATION: there is a free parking garage near the museum; otherwise, downtown San Diego is very expensive to park.
2. Further Discussion of your Blogs
3. QUIZ #1 on 10-3

Street Art, Gardens, Graffiti, Borders
SCREEN:
Ron Finley: A Guerilla Gardener in South Central LA
Transcript of his Ted Talk
The Grow-Your-Own-Food evangelist
“Growing your own food is like printing your own money.”
“Gardening in my graffiti. I grow my art.”“I wanted a carrot without toxic ingredients I didn’t know how to spell.”

Retna: Moca TV : “his signature, personally-developed script. It’s the artist’s self-styled unique language influenced by Old English, Asian calligraphy and ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics – to name a few. The result is a complex, striking and deeply personal original alphabet that Retna uses to inscribe his thoughts and enhance his art.” —Emily Kendy

Victory for Veggies: No More Citations for Curbside Veggies in Los Angeles
“My garden has become a tool for the transformation, for the education, a tool for the emancipation of my neighborhood. . . . There should be gardens with schools in them, not schools with gardens . . . flip the paradigm on its ass.” —Finley

Ecolutionary renegades . . . Gangsta gardeners. We’ve got to flip the script on what a gangsta is. Let your shovel be your weapon of choice.

“This problem is bigger than South Central—it’s universal. From Nairobi and Norway to Ireland to all parts of Canada and Chicago,companies are producing food and drinks that are killing us and that needs to be addressed. In South Central there are four churches on one block but you have to go miles for an organic apple. How does this serve the community?” —Finley

Ron Finley: Urban Gardening: A [Johnny] Appleseed with Attitude: “aligns more with graffiti artists like Risk and Retna, both friends of Mr. Finley’s, than with English horticulturalists of yore.”

Don Bartletti,The Roads Most Traveled: Causes and Consequences of Illegal Immigration: Annenberg Space for Photography: preparation for MCASD Exhibition, and guests David Avalos and Mike Wilken

Big Country: Transatlantic Sessions: preparation for Bela Fleck and class next week with Mike Wilken

HOMEWORK:
WATCH + POST: Bela Fleck: Throw Down Your Heart : Post due by Sunday at midnight at the latest


WEEK 4 09-19 CLASS CANCELLED for Critical Family Emergency
I am moving Quiz #1 one week later, from 10-26 to 10-03.
I’ll give the quiz at 5:30 pm before the Jazz Trio comes at 6:30 pm on 10-03.

Your blog post on Bela Fleck, Throw Down Your Heart, is due Sunday, 09-18, by 11:59 pm.

HOMEWORK:
READ: “DeLIMITations,” by Robert Pincus BEFORE attending the exhibition
VISIT: MCASD Downtown: Exhibition: must visit by Sunday, 9-25 to be prepared for class discussion on 9-26; Sunday is the last day to see the exhibition and post by 11:59 pm, Sunday, 09-25:
SHOOT
: a selfie of yourself at the museum to show everyone that you’ve been there.

POST: Due by Sunday, 09-25 by 11:59.  WRITE: an in-depth post about one artist or installation at MCASD, equivalent of a 0ne-page word document, @250 words minimum.

SHOOT
: a selfie of yourself at the museum to show everyone that you’ve been there. Add to post. If you don’t know how to add a photo, I’ll show you next week.


WEEK 5 09-26 Purchase Scantron and #2 PENCIL for next week’s quiz
Cultural Revitalization :: Reclamation ::  Regeneration
Tradition intersection with Innovation

Student Blogs: Throw Down Your Heart
Shaqueena Copeland

Simone Hamilton

Ashley McBride

Dulce Aispuro

Asia McCullough

Sana Bouguerra

1.
Bela Fleck: Throw Down Your Heart film (times below are from the film in Cougar Courses)
18:00 to 25:55
Ruth Akello thumb piano
Nakabaka Fatina with Nakisenyi Women’s Group in Uganda
1:23:12
Oumou Sangaré: Djorolen
“The worried songbird cries out in the forest,
Her thoughts go far away,
For those of us without fathers,
Her thoughts…. go out to them”

2.Exhibition at MCASD and DeLIMITations article

Karen Oviedo

Chris Banez

Brad Duff

Phoebe Belviz

Sean Hernandez

Jessie Panis

Think Like a Scientist: Boundaries  Krista Schlyer: Borderlands: an expanded view of immigration to include all species

3. Buena Vista Social Club film and website
Buena Vista Social Club: making of the movie:
Charlie Rose, Ry Cooder, Wim Wenders
Transcript

4. “La Bamba
Richie Valens’ version of the Mexican folk song “La Bamba” is ranked number 354 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It is the only song on the list sung in a language other than English.—Wikipedia
Valens is considered the first Latino/Chicano “rocker.”

“La Bamba” is a classic example of the Son Jarocho musical style, which originated in the Mexican state of Veracruz and combines Spanish, indigenous, and African musical elements.

PREY TO ENCHANTMENT Chronicles of Song and Fandango Andrés Moreno Nájera
Spanish and English versions, with different photos in each section

Presas del Encuentro: published  by
Programa de Desarrollo Cultural del Sotaventa
Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes

HOMEWORK:
WATCH AND POST: Buena Vista Social Club  (available in Cougar Courses)
STUDY: QUIZ #1 next class
PURCHASE: SCANTRON for next week’s QUIZ #1 at 5:30 sharp


WEEK 6 10-03 Bring Scantron and #2 Pencil for QUIZ #1 at 5:30 sharp
QUIZ #1 at 5:30 SHARP
Seojin Won

LATIN JAZZ TRIO AT 6:30 PM

GUESTS: Latin Jazz Trio: Gunnar Biggs, Mike Holguin, & piano player TBA
Gunnar Biggs, bass:
Southern California bassist/music educator. He is active in many genres of musical performance including jazz, Latin, classical, world, and experimental. Recently retired from San Diego State University after twenty five years as Instructor of Double Bass and as Director of Jazz Ensembles at Palomar Community College, Gunnar continues to maintain a thriving private teaching practice, and an important part of the San Diego jazz scene here for over 30 years. Co-founder with CSUSM Professor William Bradbury of MandoBasso.

Mike Holguin
Mike began his career in the US Navy where he played in the Navy Band program touring the world. His versatility and passion for all styles led him to play with artists like Grammy Award winners Celia Cruz, Leann Rimes, Lee Ann Womack, Juice Newton and Steve Vauss. He has performed with John Michael Montgomery, Jamie O’Neal, Phil Vassar, James Otto, Josh Gracin, Bucky Covington, Little River Band, Son Mayor, Jose Rizo’s “Jazz on the latin side All Stars”, Yari More Orquesta, The Gilbert Castellanos Latin Jazz Quintet, Brad Steinwehe’s SD Jazz Orchestra, The Soul Persuaders and many others.

Mike has also served as Musical Director for groups such as Big Time Operator, Mr. Jack Costanzo (AKA Mr. Bongo) and the US Navy Salsa Band “Sabor”. Mike currently teaches percussion at San Diego State University, Rancho Bernardo HS, Mira Mesa HS, and Francis Parker School. He has hundreds of studio sessions to his name and was most notably featured in the blockbuster movie “Pearl Harbor.” Mike is a proud endorser of Evans Drum Heads and Vic Firth Sticks.

HOMEWORK
WATCH + POST:
One post on both films. Both are in Cougar Courses
1. La Mission, for David Avalos’ class next week: pay special attention to the custom car art, mural art, dances, ceremonies . . . setting is Very important. And of course, pay attention to the different views of what constitutes “masculinity.” (In Cougar Courses)

2. La Familia / My Family, with Jimmie Smits, et al.   In Cougar Courses
Again, pay special attention to the HOUSE, the colors, the decorations, etc designed by artist Patssi Valdez. Also to the role of women in the film, the role of the corn, the milpa.

“For Gregory Nava’s 1995 film,  Mi Familia, Valdez was hired to paint several works for the movie and assist in the production design. Nava [the director] said he was attracted to her use of strong colors and ability to give life to a room.

“The house is like a character in the movie,” Nava said. “I wanted it to be a living, breathing thing. The objects in the house give [the home] emotional meaning. Her art is profoundly moving. I love her sense of color and the quality of her imagery.”—Lorenza Munoz, “A Painter’s Great Escape”
Patssi Valdez contemporary house painting


WEEK 7 10-10
GUEST
: David Avalos, Professor, SofA
He will discuss the MCASD Exhibition as well as the two films, La Mission and Mi Familia/My Family

David Avalos BIO: From Artspace: Born in San Diego in 1947, David Avalos is a forceful societal observer and provocateur who employs confrontational gesture, poetic metaphor, philosophical inquiry, public interaction, and a variety of more standard art-making skills – video, sculpture, photography, etc. – in the creation of potent performances/installations/public art works.

Long involved in the Chicano art movement, he has been student, peer, and mentor to three generations of artists/activists dedicated to social justice and the preservation and evolution of their cultural traditions.

In his solo work as an artist, his ongoing collaborations with other artists, and in his role as a professor at California State University, San Marcos, Avalos extends the research and scholarship of contemporary inter-disciplinary discourse. He has been encouraged in that effort by the receipt of numerous grants and awards, including two National Endowment for the Arts Artist Fellowships, two Inter-Arts New Forms grants, and support from the California Arts council and San Diego County.

Avalos’ work has been showcased in several solo exhibitions, as well as numerous group shows throughout the U.S. and in Mexico, Venezuela, Canada, and France. His collaborative works with other artists have addressed audiences in Turkey, England, Sweden, Spain, France, Mexico, and the U.S., engaging each local community in a discussion of identity, cultural tradition and change, public/private codes of behavior, and other issues of global concern.

HOMEWORK:
STUDY: Quiz #2 next week at 5:30 sharp
Quiz #2 is based on Mi FamiliaLa MissionSongcatcher, the Latin Jazz Trio’s presentation, and David Avalos’ lecture. Make sure to check out the notes on this syllabus for the films and presentations.

WATCH & POST: Songcatcher (it’s in Cougar Courses)
Notes on Songcatcher
American Roots Music
: Cultural influences: “Scotch-Irish jigs and reels and African syncopation and stringed instruments: help make the music: roots of this blending are very early.” —instrumentalist for Songcatcher

SongcatcherMaggie Greenwald: writer and director
Songcatcher is  based on the woman who first collected the ballads: Olive Dame Campbell, a minister’s wife. A settlement school is different than a missionary school: goal is to educate while helping to preserve the culture. Olive Campbell and her husband John had the goals of helping to preserve the culture.

Filmed in mountains above Asheville, North Carolina
Set in the village of Clover in Appalachia: In the village of Clover are the purist versions of English folk songs still being sung, because the region is so remote that they haven’t been influenced by other music: more closed off from change.

At the beginning of Songcather, the main character, Lily Penleric, is an academic whose work is about the world: She is not immersed in the world she studies.

Barbara Allen: This was the first ballad collected in the mountains:
This famous ballad is used 3 times in film, and next week, you will hear Bill Bradbury and Gunnar Biggs play their rendition as well.
1. Opening scene: a traditional English version is played by Lily Penleric
2. Mountain version: Emmy Rossum / Deladis
3. Contemporary version: Emmylou Harris

These Appalachian folk tunes influenced Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, Emmy Lou Harris, Bill Bradbury & Gunnar Biggs.

Emmy Rossum plays Deladis: This was her first experience singing mountain style. Emmy Rossum: operatic training. Side note: Rossum received an academy award nomination for her performance as Christine in the film version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera, so she may be familiar to you.
Rossum  sings :Barbara Allen” as is the first song Lily hears in the mountains: When Lily hears the ballad, this is a defining, mind-blowing moment for her. Everything changes for Lily after this as she transforms from a rather “stiff” academic to a woman who embraces many things . . .


WEEK 8 10-17    QUIZ #2
QUIZ #2 at 5:30

Amanda Seiler

Holly Schuck

Amanda Smolin

Sheila Steele

GUESTS: MandoBasso: Gunnar Biggs and Bill Bradbury at 6:30
Gunnar Biggs comes from a strong background in jazz and classical performance, and Bill Bradbury from a composition and computer music background.  Their mutual love of Irish and traditional American music brought them together in this unique pairing of mandolin and bass. MandoBasso performances include arrangements of traditional music, new compositions, classical music repertoire, jazz and ragtime.—from Gunnar Biggs’ website

William Bradbury is an Emmy Award-winning composer. He received his doctoral degree in music composition from Cornell University where he studied with Karel Husa, Steven Stucky and Yehudi Wyner. While at Cornell he also studied Indonesian gamelan with Sumarsam and Martin Hatch as well as music theory with William Austin and Roger Parker. Bradbury is currently Professor of Music and Music Technology in the School of Arts at California State University, San Marcos.

HOMEWORK:
WATCH & POST: Billy Elliot, culture, dance, gender
In Cougar Courses and available to rent: Amazon $2.99;
If you rent it, make sure to turn on closed captions or subtitles if you have difficulty understanding the characters. It will help immensely.


WEEK 9 10-24
GUEST: Karen Schaffman: DANCE & GENDER; her class will be joining us as well.

HOMEWORK
1. WATCH: 
Sherman Alexie: Living Outside Borders: 40 minute interview with Bill Moyers
Smoke Signals written by Coeur D’Alene Sherman Alexie based on his short story collection “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven.”

WATCH & POST: Smoke Signals: in Cougar Courses.
Also available on Amazon: $2.99

2. STUDY for QUIZ #3: covers
1. Billy Elliot
2. Smoke Signals
3. MandoBasso
4. Gender & Dance
5. Sherman Alexie: “Living Outside Borders”: 40 minute interview with Bill Moyers: see under homework directly above


WEEK 10 10-31  QUIZ #3 at 5:30 sharp
Student Blog Posts
Smoke Signals
Daniel Ceballos
Sean Hernandez
Helen Sedrak
Billy Elliot
Bianca Maitia
Holly Schuck
La Mission
Elizabeth Contreras

PART 1: Introduction for Seri/Comcaac Women’s Cooperative on 11-07
Artisans: Panchita, Carmen, Patty, and Diana Moreno, and Raquel Hoffer, all from Desemboque, Sonora, Mexico;
Saturday, Nov. 05: Tree of Life Nursery is honored to host a group of artisans from the indigenous Seri (Comcáac) tribe. Hailing from the arid coast of Sonora, Mexico, the Seri are famous for their amazing basketry, beautiful necklaces of shell, bead and bone, and elegant ironwood carvings. This special event will begin with a cultural exchange, as the Acjachemen people welcome the Seri to their ancestral land, followed by a traditional Seri dance and ceremonial songs. These Seri artisans will have their finest items available for sale, and in the spirit of “fair trade,” 100 percent of the sale proceeds will stay with the artisans.
Seri post1
Seri post2
Seri post3 facepainting
Abe Sanchez: master basketweaver Gathering Deergrass video
Mike Gray: AFSC, Liaison with Seri communities

a . Graciela Iturbide, Art 21, Season 7: 18:53 to 35 amazon
b. Seri photos by Iturbide: Iturbide’s website
c. Iturbide’s best photograph: in her words

Part 2: Preparation for American Film Festival films
Smoke Signals: Chapters 21-22
Music
Song Title: Wah Jhi Le Yihm. Smoke Signals Sountrack by BC Smith and Forgive Our Fathers Suite by Ulali

Ulali (posts from YouTube link below): This song is in the Tutelo language… I had it translated by one of our speakers from home in NC. It’s an old pigeon dialect of our Old Siouan, Iroquois and coastal Algonquin people’s languages together.  All 3 of our big nations have lived together for thousands of years here in what is now the present Virginia and Carolina’s. This is a place that many nations migrated out of and went on traveling north, west and some more south and all over. An old hub!! Also this is a song for healing and giving back to the water and letting the water wash and clean and the spirit rise those are some of the words in the song. Wahjheeleh Yihm… means I carry you with me… So…it means let the water carry you… It’s an ancestral song for the dead and the water as the sacred source…where some of us put in the ashes as a return to be free spirit!! I wrote this song with the help of my cousin Jennifer and Soni. We are Ulali…

Mother: a Ulali song

Poetry:
How do we forgive our fathers?
Maybe in a dream
Do we forgive our fathers for leaving us too often or forever when we were little?

Maybe for scaring us with unexpected rage or making us
nervous because there never seemed to be any rage there at all.

Do we forgive our fathers for marrying or not marrying our mothers?
For divorcing or not divorcing our mothers?
And shall we forgive them for their excesses of warmth or coldness?

Shall we forgive them for pushing or leaning, for shutting doors,
for speaking through walls, or never speaking, or never
being silent?

Do we forgive our fathers in our age or in theirs or in their
deaths, saying it to them or not saying it?
If we forgive our fathers, what else is left?

—Dick Lourie, “Forgiving Our Fathers”

HOMEWORK
WATCH & POST: Whale Rider (in Cougar Courses)


WEEK 11 11-07
GUESTS: Seri Women’s Cooperative

HOMEWORK:
WATCH + POST: The Sapphires, based on a true story
in Cougar Courses, or rent for 2.99 on Amazon

Trailer for The Sapphires
Interview with Wayne Blair, Director
Interview with Tony Briggs, Screenwriter and son of one of the original Sapphires; and Wayne Blair, Director


WEEK 12 11-14
CLASS:
1 . Self-Representation
Reel Injun excerpt
: DVD start at Alcatraz 54:00, also on Netflix
Interview Wayne Blair
Boarding Schools, NPR: “Kill the Indian, Save the Man”

2. Rabbit-Proof Fence excerpt: Amazon
3. Discuss Sapphires and relationship to Rabbit-Proof Fence

4. American Indian Film Festival
American Indian & Indigenous Film Festival November 17-19
Film Schedule

5. Slideshow review for Seri visit last week

HOMEWORK:  FREE TICKETS for FILM FESTIVAL
you can pick yours up at the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center in SBSB,
or you can show your ID when you attend one of the films.

ATTEND & POST: about the film you attend at the Native American Film Festival
You must post a Selfie from the American Indian & Indigenous Film Festival:
make sure your selfie shows us that you’ve attended. Thank you!

STUDY:
for QUIZ #4
Covers:
Whale Rider
Sapphires
Rabbit-Proof Fence excerpt
Reel Injun excerpt
Seri visitors
Graciela Iturbide
Interview Tony Briggs
Interview Wayne Blair
Ulali


WEEK 13: 11-21   QUIZ #4|

Ai Weiwei: political art agenda, social media at work: “Blogs and the internet are great inventions for our time because they give regular people an opportunity to change public opinion.” —Ai Weiwei


On Alcatraz, Ai Weiwei celebrates the Silenced

Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz: @Large

The Army and American Indian Prisoners“: Re-education camps: from the National Park Service:

The largest group of Indian prisoners to be confined on Alcatraz were nineteen Hopi “hostiles.” Their crimes may have been the most unique in the 140-year history of incarceration on the Rock, they wouldn’t farm as the government instructed them to, and they opposed forced education in government boarding schools. Both “offenses” were part of widespread resistance to U.S. policies designed to erase Hopi language and religion.

Newspaper accounts talk about Hopi resistance to forced “education” (children were routinely beaten if they spoke Hopi or made any attempt to practice their religion), and of their refusal to farm the individual allotments of land established by a series of Indian agents (the commander-in-chief of the U.S. Army once wrote home that “There has been no branch of the government so corrupt and disgraceful to the Republic as that which has had the management of our Indian affairs.

Alison Klayman: Director of Ai Weiwei, from The Common Good

New York Times chief film critics A.O. Scott and Manohla Dargis named Alison Klayman one of their 20 Directors to Watch on a list of rising international filmmaking talents under 40. Her debut feature documentary, AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY, was shortlisted for an Academy Award, nominated for two Emmys, and earned Alison a Director’s Guild of America nomination. It premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival where it won a Special Jury Prize, and was picked up by IFC Films. NEVER SORRY has now been translated into over 26 languages and released theatrically around the world. It was also one of the highest grossing films of 2012 directed by a woman.

What a long way to come from Fall 2006, when Alison went to China fresh out of college on a trip meant to last five months. She traveled to places like Tibet and Taiwan, and began learning Mandarin Chinese. The underlying motive for travel was an aspiration to be a journalist and filmmaker.

After those first few months in China, Alison had a hunch that staying would be the best way to pursue her goals. She canceled her ticket home, and moved to Beijing to hone her language skills in the workplace. She answered a slew of online job ads and became an English coach on the set of a Jackie Chan/Jet Li film; wrote about basketball for the official 2008 Olympic website; voiced cartoons and made silicone dummies for a special effects studio.

By 2008, she was an accredited journalist and went on to produce radio and television feature stories for PBS Frontline, NPR’s “All Things Considered” and others. She also began shooting NEVER SORRY, following the artist/activist for three years and gaining unprecedented access to his life and work.

Alison has made many media appearances to speak about her documentary work, including on The Colbert Report. She is a regular contributor to the New York Times’ Emmy-nominated Op-Doc Series, and a grant recipient of the Ford Foundation, Sundance Institute, Henry Luce Foundation, Jerome Foundation, Chicken and Egg Pictures and Britdoc. In 2011 she was a Sundance Creative Producing Fellow and one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film.” She continues to be a frequent guest speaker at major art museums and universities around the world. She graduated from Brown University in 2006 with an honors B.A. in History.

El Anatsui: Art:21, Season 6, viewed in class
Maya Lin: Art:21, Season 1, viewed in class
Leonardo Drew, fromArt:21, Season 7, viewed in class

HOMEWORK:
WATCH & POST: Ai Weiwei, Never Sorry: (no longer available in Cougar Courses)
2.99 on Amazon 
Free on Netflix streaming
3.99 on iTunes


WEEK 14: 11-28
GUEST: CSUSM Anthropologist Mike Wilken

HOMEWORK: WATCH & POST
1. Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Light (in Cougar Courses)

2. Study for Final Quiz, which covers
Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry film
Ai Weiwei: Class discussion and Syllabus
Alison Klayman: from the syllabus

El Anatsui, from Art:21, Season 6, Change segment, viewed in class
Leonardo Drew, from Art:21, Season 7, Investigation segment, viewed in class
Maya Lin, from Art:21, Season 1, Identity segment, viewed in class
If you missed seeing them in class, they are available for viewing/renting here:
Amazon: Art21: Art in the Twenty-First Century

Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Light film

Mike Wilken: Art & Anthropology lecture


WEEK 15: 12-05 FINAL/QUIZ # 5

Final Quiz covers
Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry film
Ai Weiwei: Class discussion and Syllabus
Alison Klayman: from the syllabus

El Anatsui, from Art:21, Season 6, Change segment, viewed in class
Leonardo Drew, from Art:21, Season 7, Investigation segment, viewed in class
Maya Lin, from Art:21, Season 1, Identity segment, viewed in class
If you missed seeing them in class, they are available for viewing/renting here:
Amazon: Art21: Art in the Twenty-First Century

Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Light film

Mike Wilken: Art & Anthropology lecture






BELOW ARE EXTRA NOTES; NOT ON QUIZ
Falling Slowly, Once

Vets At Standing Rock

Notes on Songcatcher
American Roots Music: “Scotch-Irish jigs and reels and African syncopation and stringed instruments: help make the music: roots of this blending are very early.” instrumentalist for Songcatcher

Songcatcher: Maggie Greenwald: writer and director
Songcatcher is  based on the woman who first collected the ballads: Olive Dame Campbell, a minister’s wife. A settlement school is different than a missionary school: goal is to educate while helping to preserve the culture. Olive Campbell and her husband John had the goals of helping to preserve the culture.

Filmed in mountains above Asheville, North Carolina
Set in the village of Clover in Appalachia: In the village of Clover are the purist versions of English folk songs still being sung, because the region is so remote that they haven’t been influenced by other music: more closed off from change.

At the beginning of Songcather, the main character, Lily Penleric, is an academic whose work is about the world: She is not immersed in the world she studies.

Barbara Allen: This was the first ballad collected in the mountains:
This famous ballad is used 3 times in film, and next week, you will hear Bill Bradbury and Gunnar Biggs play their rendition as well.
Opening scene: traditional English version played by Lily Penleric
Mountain version: Emmy Rossum / Deladis
Contemporary version: Emmylou Harris

These Appalachian folk tunes influenced Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, Emmy Lou Harris, Bill Bradbury & Gunnar Biggs.

Rossum plays Deladis: first experience singing mountain style. Emmy Rossum: operatic training.
She sings :Barbara Allen” as first song Lily hears in the mountains: this is a defining, mind-blowing moment for Lily.
Rossum received an academy award nomination for her performance as Christine in the film version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera, the same musical to which Walter takes Mouna in The Visitor, a film we will watch later in the semester.

SCREEN: Julie & Julia: French cooking and blogging
#4      12:45 to 18:51
#7      25:10 to 30:45

Ethnobotany Project: Deborah Small
Chia Cafe Collective: Deborah Smal

El Anatsui: Art 21 Season 6

Camille Seaman website

Camille Seaman Ted Talks: Polar ice

Camille Seaman Ted Talks Storm Chaser

Bryan Jungen Art 21 Season 8
Brian Jungen was born in Fort St. John, British Columbia, Canada in 1970. He draws from his family’s ranching and hunting background, as well as his Dane-zaa heritage, when disassembling and recombining consumer goods into whimsical sculptures.

Local Native American Communities
Tending the “Wild” Preview
Weaving Community: video re Tima Link and Nick Hernandez
Weaving the World Together: Tima Link

SCREEN: Swoon: from Our City Dreams

Grant Achatz: Chef’s Table: the art of edibles: short excerpt on Netflix