World Cultures Fall 2015

VPA 311: WORLD CULTURES:   Fall 2015
ACD 102;  Wednesday, 5:30-8:15 p.m.
READER: 
sophia.young1977@yahoo.com

Office hours: Tuesday 2:30-5:30, or by appointment; Arts Building 331;  760-750-4151
Email: dsmall@csusm.edu
Deborah Small Blog

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In World Cultures, we will explore contemporary world cultural practices ranging from indigenous expressions to new electronic forms in a global and multi-disciplinary context. The class consists of readings, discussions, lectures, videos, visiting artists, writing, quizzes, and attending arts events.

World Cultures will focus on cultural dissemination, dispersion, Diaspora, migration, and exchange. We will look at art that is colonialist as well as anti-colonialist in its assumptions about the world. We will question how cultural practices act as oppositional and critical forces.

The works we will study often incorporate a variety of diverse cultural influences, a reflection of artists’ cultural identities and societies as multiple rather than singular, shifting rather than stable, products of colonization as well as anti-colonial struggles.

We will examine who has the power to creates frameworks for understanding, interpreting, and evaluating cultural practices.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
By analyzing films, reading selected texts, engaging with guest artists, attending lectures, and attending outside art events, you will:
1. Explore the meaning of artistic expression about relevant social, political, and cultural issues of our time.
2. Understand how world cultures have been diminished, and explore global efforts at revitalization of those cultures
3. Explore the role of folk arts and grassroots movements in the arts and syncretism in cultural practices.
4. Explore cultural practices that offer transformative paradigms for social engagement and creativity: art that celebrates what it means to be human in an increasingly globalized culture.
5. Examine the extent to which art practices are oppositional and critical and/or reproduce conventional assumptions about the world and reinforce cultural hegemony.

ART EVENTS: The course includes a Visual and Performing Arts Program Arts Events Attendance Requirement. You are required to attend one event this semester. You can choose between attending James Luna’s performance on September 12, ISHI: The Archive Performance at CSUSM, or to the attend a screening of one of the films at the San Diego American Indian Film Festival, November 19-21, which takes place on our campus and at Pechanga.

WRITING: All writing is on your blog site. 
1. A minimum of two paragraph response to the films that are required as homework each week for the class. In your first person narrative, you should comment on whatever is most significant for you, what will you remember about the film a year from now, how did it inspire you (or not). I am interested in your reaction to the film, your analysis of why it was moving, compelling, boring, redundant, exciting for you, and why. I will evaluate the overall thoughtfulness and quality of your blog responses. VERY IMPORTANT: Your blog post title should be the name of the film.
You will also post a:
2. 250 word (equivalent of one page) write-up of one of the films from the San Diego American Indian Film Festival in November,.It would be great for you to include photos of the events, and cell-phone photos are fine. Again your response should be a first person narrative about the significance of the film and the event for you.
An alternative is to attend James Luna’s ISHI: The Archive Performance, on September 12 at CSUSM

ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING
80%
5 Quizzes throughout the semester on videos, readings, and lectures; 
I will count your top 4 quizzes, but quizzes will be cumulative, so make sure that you borrow notes from someone if you miss a class and that you do all the reading and film assignments. YOU MUST TAKE THE FINAL QUIZ #5.
NO MAKE-UP QUIZZES NO EXCEPTIONS: that’s why I’m taking the top 4, and I understand that life happens . . .
20%: Blog


SYLLABUS
This syllabus is provisional. We will have wonderful guests coming to our class, but there will be changes. Please check the website every week for your homework assignment and to note any updates to incorporate relevant materials. Our guests coming this semester  include: Mike Wilken, anthropologist; Bill Bradbury and Gunner Biggs, Mando Basso musicians; Chicano artist David Avalos, Playwright Marcos Martinez, among others. They are in the process of giving me their dates.

ANNOUNCE: ART EVENT: James Luna: The Archive Performance, ARTS 111, Saturday, September 12
RSVP ASAP: see poster below:
James Luna

ANNOUNCE: San Diego American Indian Film Festival, CSUSM, Nov 19-21; REQUIRED: attend one film
Screen Shot 2015-09-02 at 1.28.51 PM

WEEK 1   SEPTEMBER 02
Art as Transformation

INTRODUCTION: to class and attendance
DISCUSS: Blogs for the class: student Blog from previous semester:
Marianne Hughes
Armando Madrigal
Andruski, Ashley: 
Two essential encounters that changed my life: PLEASE READ THIS

Cougar Course container with films for the class; Netflix streaming membership; renting from Amazon

PLAY: 3 minute aria
SCREEN:
1. 8 minute excerpt from The Shawshank Redemption:
Start Scene #18:
Aria: Marriage of Figaro: #13 on CD
2. Interview with Lila Downs from Frida
3. Interview with Julie Taymor and Bill Moyers from Fridatranscript art as a transformative practice
4. Julie/Julia excerpts re blogging
5. In Class writing: Following Julie Taymor,  what is a defining moment in your life?

Re World Cultures: Think about what we all have in common, and what language is: Wade Davis, cultural anthropologist:
 “We all share the same adaptive imperatives. We’re all born. We all bring our children into the world. We go through initiation rites. We have to deal with the inexorable separation of death . . . we all sing. We all dance. We all have art. What’s interesting is the unique cadence of the song, the rhythm of the dance in every culture. . .” This are our commonality. This is our humanity.
Why study other cultures: to learn that they’re are “other ways of being, other ways of thinking, other ways of orienting yourself to the earth.”

“A language is not just a body of vocabulary, or a set of grammatical rules. A language is a flash of the human spirit . . . Every language is an old growth forest of the mind, a watershed of thought, an entire ecosystem of spiritual possibilities.” 

We will look at many kinds of languages, not only spoken language, but the language of the body, the language of improvisation, the language of plants, of trees . . .

HOMEWORK:
1. WATCH: Frida  with Salma Hayek:
You can also watch Frida on Netflix streaming or Amazon rent for $2.99, or is you have Amazon Prime, it is free. 
2. CREATE:
 your blog at wordpress.com
VERY IMPORTANT 
please use this as the form for your blog
firstnamelastname.wordpress.com
• for example: deborahsmall.wordpress.com
• the Title of your blog should contain your name as well.

3. BLOG POSTS: you will do two blog posts for next week:
a. Your defining moment that you wrote about in class
b. Frida:
(
from the syllabus above)minimum of two paragraph response to the films that are required as homework each week for the class. In your first person narrative, you should comment on whatever is most significant for you, what will you remember about the film a year from now, how did it inspire you (or not). I am interested in your reaction to the film, your analysis of why it was moving, compelling, boring, redundant, exciting for you, and why. I will evaluate the overall thoughtfulness and quality of your blog responses.


WEEK 2   SEPTEMBER 09
Art as Transformation
SEND: Your blog address to our READER at: sophia.young1977@yahoo.com
REVIEW
Blog structure, title, your name, how to import an image, etc:
SCREEN: Julie & Julia: French cooking and blogging
#4      12:45 to 18:51
#7      25:10 to 30:45

DISCUSS: Frida
What do you think that the renowned Mexican writer and public intellectual, Carlos Fuentes, is getting at when he says: “She wants to sacralize (make sacred) everything she touches.”
SCREEN: excerpts The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo
39:10 to 42:26  Detroit: breakthrough: defining moment

“The breakthrough was Detroit. In Detroit, Frida Kahlo for the first time, consciously decided that she will paint about herself, and that she will paint the most private and most painful aspects of herself. And not only that, that she will use a genre that is popular, that is Mexican, and that is religious, in order to best convey that. And that threshold opens up her possibilities. And in a nutshell, she already has her style that is going to define her work up until the end of her life; that is, an artist who is able to innovate tradition, to make it new, and to use various genres and various formats of intimacy to tell her story and to reveal herself. And to reveal herself and tell her story as the only alternative she has to live a whole life . . .”.
—Victor Zamundio Taylor, art historian

34:24 to 36:24 sources for her paintings: Mexican folk art, retablos, and most importantly, herself
56:28 to 101:35  Painting: ” . . . it is the beauty of the artist to make the invisibility visible.” —Carlos Fuentes
1:16:50 to 1:20:40  Frida’s philosophy: Everything is all and one.”
“She wants to sacralize everything she touches. She’s in love with the world as garden.” —Carlos Fuentes

SCREEN:
PBS Art 21:
El Anatsui: contemporary artist inspired by tradition: Kente cloth and weaving: Season 6
PBS Art 21: Maya Lin: Season 1

HOMEWORK:
WATCH:
Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Light
POST:
1. a blog entry on Maya Lin with the title of the film as the title of your blog post
2. Watch the remainder of Frida, the half not up on Cougar Courses last week) and post an blog entry.
You can also watch Frida on Netflix streaming or Amazon rent for $2.99, or is you have Amazon Prime, it is free.
It will be a much higher resolution version that what they are allowed to digitize for Cougar Courses.
(from the syllabus above)minimum of two paragraph response to the films that are required as homework each week for the class. In your first person narrative, you should comment on whatever is most significant for you, what will you remember about the film a year from now, how did it inspire you (or not). I am interested in your reaction to the film, your analysis of why it was moving, compelling, boring, redundant, exciting for you, and why. I will evaluate the overall thoughtfulness and quality of your blog responses.

READ: Mike Wilken’s: “News from Baja California: A Resurgence of Traditional Arts” to prepare for our guest artist/anthropologist week

SENDYour blog address to our READER for the class: sophia.young1977@yahoo.com

READ: First Person NarrationSophia Young, our reader, has written a very helpful summary of what first person narration is. This will help you as you write your blogs.
Blog post should be completed by Monday night (not Tuesday) before 11:55 pm.


WEEK 3   SEPTEMBER 16
Arts & Culture
GUESTSMike Wilken: “Traditional Arts of Baja California, Mexico”
SCREEN: Sing Birds: Following the Path of Cahuilla Power

READ: First Person NarrationSophia Young, our reader, has written a very helpful summary of what first person narration is. This will help you as you write your blogs.
Sophia asked that I annouce that everyone should have their blogs completed by Monday night (not Tuesday) before 11:55 pm.

HOMEWORK:
WATCH:  Food, Inc 
and write a post:
Available in Cougar Courses, free on Netflix streaming, Amazon $2.99, or free with Amazon Prime
WRITE: a post about Food, Inc;
Blog posts should be completed by Monday night before 11:55 pm.

READIs Reintroducing Acorns into the Human Diet a Nutty Idea?”

PREPARE: for Quiz #1 next week

READ: all of the notes carefully that are on the syllabus above for the weeks we have covered so far
Quiz #1 covers
:
Shawshank Redemption clip and aria
Julie Taymor’s interview with Bill Moyers: see linked transcript above
Lila Downs interview shown in class
Excerpts from Life and Times of Frida Kahlo I showed in class: see notes above
Frida, film: please remember the names of the most important people in her life for multiple choice questions
PBS Art 21: “El Anatsui”: link is above
PBS Art 21: “Maya Lin”: link is above
Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision film
Mike Wilken’s article: “News from Baja California . . . “, linked above
Mike Wilken’s lecture
Sing Birds video: linked above on Vimeo if you missed the film screening in class
Food, Inc

PLEASE SEND your BLOG ADDRESS to SOPHIA if you have not already done so at:
sophia.young1977@yahoo.com


WEEKS 4 September 23
QUIZ #1

Art, Gardens, Graffiti, Sustainablity
PART 1: 
SCREEN
:
Ron Finley: A Guerilla Gardener in South Central LA
Transcript of his Ted Talk
The Grow-Your-Own-Food evangelist
“Growing your own food is like printing your own money.”
“Gardening in my graffiti. I grow my art.”“I wanted a carrot without toxic ingredients I didn’t know how to spell.”

Retna: Moca TV : “his signature, personally-developed script. It’s the artist’s self-styled unique language influenced by Old English, Asian calligraphy and ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics – to name a few. The result is a complex, striking and deeply personal original alphabet that Retna uses to inscribe his thoughts and enhance his art.” —Emily Kendy

Victory for Veggies: No More Citations for Curbside Veggies in Los Angeles
“My garden has become a tool for the transformation, for the education, a tool for the emancipation of my neighborhood. . . . There should be gardens with schools in them, not schools with gardens . . . flip the paradigm on its ass.” —Finley

Ecolutionary renegades . . . Gangsta gardeners. We’ve got to flip the script on what a gangsta is. Let your shovel be your weapon of choice.

“This problem is bigger than South Central—it’s universal. From Nairobi and Norway to Ireland to all parts of Canada and Chicago,companies are producing food and drinks that are killing us and that needs to be addressed. In South Central there are four churches on one block but you have to go miles for an organic apple. How does this serve the community?” —Finley

Ron Finley: Urban Gardening: A [Johnny] Appleseed with Attitude: “aligns more with graffiti artists like Risk and Retna, both friends of Mr. Finley’s, than with English horticulturalists of yore.”

Ethnobotany Project: Deborah Small

PART 2: Cuba, Music & Art: to prepare for our Latin Jazz Trio guests next week: this will continue next week before our Jazz Trio arrives
SCREEN:

Jose Parla interview: Writing street artist/painter as anthropologist
Parlá’s markings echo the distressed surfaces of the walls he inscribes, and offer commentary on the lives of Cuba’s elders; together, JR and Parlá’s murals marvelously animate a city whose walls are otherwise adorned only by images of its leaders.—from JR’s website

Wrinkles of the City
In May 2012, JR collaborates with Cuban-American artist José Parlá on the latest iteration of The Wrinkles of the City: a huge mural installation in Havana, undertaken for the Havana Biennale, for which JR and Parlá photographed and recorded 25 senior citizens who had lived through the Cuban revolution, creating portraits which Parlá, who is of Cuban descent, interlaced with palimpsestic calligraphic writings and paintings.

HOMEWORK:
WATCH:  Once and write a POST for your blog. Post on Once is due Monday by 11:55 pm
Available in Amazon $2.99, Cougar Courses, or free with Amazon prime. One student reported that it’s delayed in Cougar Courses, so you might just rent it and enjoy . . .
Next week, September 30, CLASS begins at 6 PM and goes until 8:45 for our jazz trio


WEEK 5 September 30 CLASS BEGINS AT 6 PM UNTIL 8:45 for our jazz trio
DISCUSS:
Once
Selected Students read their blog posts on Once
Kayla Libuszowski
Nathan Sneller
Kory Smith
Shawnei Tirado
Jonathan Sharp
Chloe Recolaso

SCREEN: “Falling Slowly” winning Best Original Song Oscar® (3 min)
Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova accepting the Oscar® for Best Original Song for “Falling Slowly” from the indie film “Once” – the 80th Annual Academy Awards®, 2008: watch the entire 3 minutes when John Stewart bring Marketa Irglova back on stage to talk about “hope for all artists.”

The Broadway production of Once was nominated for a total of 11 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Best Actor in a Musical (Steve Kazee), Best Actress in a Musical (Cristin Milioti), Best Featured Actress in a Musical (Elizabeth A. Davis) and Best Direction of a Musical.[52] On 10 June 2012, it won eight Tony Awards including Best Musical, Best Direction of a Musical, Best Book of a Musical and Best Actor in a Musical.

GUESTS: Latin Jazz Trio: Gunnar Biggs, Allan Phillips, Tiki Pasillas
Gunnar Biggs, bass:
Southern California bassist/music educator. He is active in many genres of musical performance including jazz, Latin, classical, world, and experimental. Recently retired from San Diego State University after twenty five years as Instructor of Double Bass and as Director of Jazz Ensembles at Palomar Community College, Gunnar continues to maintain a thriving private teaching practice, and an important part of the San Diego jazz scene here for over 30 years. Co-founder of MandoBasso.

Allan Phillips, piano
One of the leaders of a generation of Composer-Producers with one eye on tradition and another eye in the future.
Prodigiously Gifted Composer, multi-instrumentalist, Venezuelan born, of African descent. He has the ability to incorporate traditional music from all around the world into the classical as well as the contemporary realm. Allan has won recognition for acclaimed album productions, recording sessions and performances with Donna Summer, Kenny Loggins, Al Jarreau (U.S.A.), Sergio Mendes (Brazil), Zap Mama (Europe/Africa), Eva Ayllon (Peru), Thomas Mapfumo (Zimbabwe), Habib Koité (Mali), Vusi Mahlasela (So. Africa) and Regino Gimenez (Cuba).

Tiki Pasillas, drums:
“Tiki” Pasillas is a drummer and multi-percussionist who has been performing professionally in Los Angeles for the over a decade. He was born in Oakland, California, where as a teenager, he won a Berkelee College of Music scholarship. He later received the Latin Stylist Award at Musician’s Institute in Los Angeles. Tiki has performed or recorded with many jazz, pop and Latin greats, including Marc Anthony, Ricky Martin, Carlos Santana, Michael Jackson, Destiny’s Child, EI DeBarge, Poncho Sanchez, Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Chick Correa, Sheila E, Cachao, Giovanni Hidalgo, Alex Acuna, Pete Escovedo, Tito Nieves, Bobby Shew, Kenny Kirkland, Justo Almario, Susie Hansen, Hiroshima, Peter Erskine, Horace Silver, Juan Pablo Torres, Paquito D’Rivera, and Kazu & Keiko Matsui, among others. He has taught drums and percussion at Musician’s Institute in Hollywood and currently teaches at Pasadena City College. A Grammy nominated performer, Tiki is a well-respected musician with worldwide recognition and is a frequent studio contributor to records, films, jingles and voice-overs.

HOMEWORK:
WATCH AND POST: Whale Rider

The film is based on the book The Whale Rider by Witi Ihimaera. Ihimaera was inspired to write the book in 1985 while living in an apartment in New York overlooking the Hudson River. “I heard helicopters whirling around and the ships in the river using all their sirens – a whale had come up the Hudson River and was spouting,” Ihimaera recalls. “It made me think of my hometown, Whangara and the whale mythology of that area.”

STUDY: QUIZ #2
Quiz covers
Food, Inc
Ron Finley
Retna
Ethnobotany Project: Deborah
Wrinkles of the City
Once
Falling Slowly
Latin Jazz Trio
Whale Rider


WEEK 6 October 7
QUIZ #2
DISCUSS

American Roots Music: “Scotch-Irish jigs and reels and African syncopation and stringed instruments: help make the music: roots of this blending are very early.” instrumentalist for Songcatcher

Songcatcher: Maggie Greenwald: writer and director
Songcatcher is  based on the woman who first collected the ballads: Olive Dame Campbell, a minister’s wife. A settlement school is different than a missionary school: goal is to educate while helping to preserve the culture. Olive Campbell and her husband John had the goals of helping to preserve the culture.

Filmed in mountains above Asheville, North Carolina
Set in the village of Clover in Appalachia: In the village of Clover are the purist versions of English folk songs still being sung, because the region is so remote that they haven’t been influenced by other music: more closed off from change.

At the beginning of Songcather, the main character, Lily Penleric, is an academic whose work is about the world: She is not immersed in the world she studies.

Barbara Allen: This was the first ballad collected in the mountains:
This famous ballad is used 3 times in film, and next week, you will hear Bill Bradbury and Gunnar Biggs play their rendition as well.
Opening scene: traditional English version played by Lily Penleric
Mountain version: Emmy Rossum / Deladis
Contemporary version: Emmylou Harris

These Appalachian folk tunes influenced Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, Emmy Lou Harris, Bill Bradbury & Gunnar Biggs.

Rossum plays Deladis: first experience singing mountain style. Emmy Rossum: operatic training.
She sings :Barbara Allen” as first song Lily hears in the mountains: this is a defining, mind-blowing moment for Lily.
Rossum received an academy award nomination for her performance as Christine in the film version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera, the same musical to which Walter takes Mouna in The Visitor, a film we will watch later in the semester.

SCREEN: Songcatcher

HOMEWORK:
WATCH and POST: Billy Elliot, culture, dance, gender
rent: Amazon $2.99; this film is NOT in Cougar Courses: please turn on closed captions or subtitles if you have difficulty understanding the characters.
Blog post should be completed by Monday night before 11:55 pm.
Think about what Billy Elliot and Whale Rider have in common.


WEEK 7 October 14
American Roots Music: Guests: Mando Basso
DISCUSS: EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY:
for a total of 16 points, the equivalent of 4 quiz questions.
Write 250 words, one page, about an artwork that compelled you, that impacted you in some powerful way.
Turn this into Deborah Small. After reading it, I will give your writing to David Avalos, who may (or may not) choose to share it with the artist.
Re-membering-500x323
Re-membering our Ancestors: Discovering Ourselves
Saturday, October 10 – Sunday, November 22, 2015
Día de los Muertos announces itself with luxuriant images and unforgettable icons. Local, regional, traditional, and non-traditional artists share the exuberance of the holiday while contemplating how memory can reintegrate lost members of families and communities.

The Museum at the California Center for the Arts,
Escondido, CA; Hours:
Thu – Sat: 10:00am – 5:00pm
Sun: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Mon – Wed: Closed

DISCUSS
: Student Blog Posts
1. Student blog presentations:
Chloe Recolaso: Once
Whale Rider:
Mikaela Long
Natalie Marshall
Alexis Astorga
Billy Elliot
Alexandro Ornelas
Rachael Hahn
Sephr Rezeal
Melissa Mandim

SCREEN
: Bela Fleck: Throw Down Your Heart excerpts
Big Country: Transatlantic Sessions
GUESTS: Mando Basso: Gunnar Biggs and Bill Bradbury
WATCH + POST: La Mission, for David Avalos’ class next week: pay special attention to the custom car art, murals, dances, ceremonies . . . and of course the different views of what constitutes “masculinity.”
Rent for 1.99 from Amazon for a good quality experience. This is a really good film!


WEEK 8 October 21
ANNOUNCEMENT: MIKE WILKEN: As part of my talk on Art and and World Cultures next week, I am inviting members of the class to send me links to videos depicting cultural arts traditions (music, dance, visual arts, theatre, storytelling, “street” arts, foods, etc.) that reflect students’ own cultural heritage. These can be folk traditions or contemporary artistic expressions from anywhere in the world. I will select a variety and show them in class.
Please send them to me as soon as possible, but no later than Tuesday, October 27th, at:

mwilken@csusm.edu
I look forward to hearing from you!

GUEST ARTIST: David Avalos
STUDENT BLOGS:
Josue Cortero

Norma Esparza

Gentijan Fici

Lane Yarnell

HOMEWORK:
1. WATCH + POST: Rabbit-Proof Fence
Rent for 2.99 on Amazon or
Free on Netflix streaming

2. QUIZ #3 NEXT WEEK: The following will be covered on the quiz

Songcatcher
Billy Elliot
Bela Fleck excerpts from Throw Down Your Heart
Big Country: Transatlantic Sessions
MandoBasso: Gunnar Biggs & Bill Bradbury
La Mission
David Avalos: Getty lecture & his lecture about  La Mission
Rabbit Proof Fence

3. ANNOUNCEMENT: MIKE WILKEN: As part of my talk on Art and and World Cultures next week, I am inviting members of the class to send me links to videos depicting cultural arts traditions (music, dance, visual arts, theatre, storytelling, “street” arts, foods, etc.) that reflect students’ own cultural heritage. These can be folk traditions or contemporary artistic expressions from anywhere in the world. I will select a variety and show them in class.
Please send them to me as soon as possible, but no later than Tuesday, October 27th, at:

mwilken@csusm.edu
I look forward to hearing from you!


EXTRA CREDIT: Please choose EITHER the Sounds of the Ancient concert or the Re-membering our Ancestors: Discovering Ourselves exhibition for extra credit. You’re welcome to go to both, but only one will count for extra credit for a total of 16 points, the equivalent of 4 quiz questions.
Write 250 words, one page, about the music, what you found compelling about it. What did you learn about Indian culture? Indian instruments? 
Please turn your writing into Deborah Small.
This concert, according to Bill Bradbury, will be amazing. He helped arrange for it to be on our campus. Hope you can attend.
india music


WEEK 9 October 28
Art & Culture
QUIZ #3
The following will be covered on the quiz

Songcatcher
Billy Elliot
Bela Fleck excerpts from Throw Down Your Heart
Big Country: Transatlantic Sessions
MandoBasso: Gunnar Biggs & Bill Bradbury
La Mission
David Avalos: Getty lecture & his lecture about  La Mission
Rabbit Proof Fence

GUEST
: Mike Wilken: Art, Culture, & Anthropology

HOMEWORK
WATCH + POST
: The Sapphires, based on a true story
rent for 2.99 on Amazon

Trailer for The Sapphires
Interview with Wayne Blair, Director
Interview with Tony Briggs, Screenwriter and son of one of the original Sapphires; and Wayne Blair, Director


WEEK 10 November 4

DISCUSS: Rabbit-Proof Fence & The Sapphires
Samantha Pyros
Jasmine Williams
Context: NRP Interview

April 4, 1967 Martin Luther King’s gives his speech: Beyond Vietnam excerpt:

“Perhaps a more tragic recognition of reality took place when it became clear to me that the war was doing far more than devastating the hopes of the poor at home. It was sending their sons and their brothers and their husbands to fight and to die in extraordinarily high proportions relative to the rest of the population. We were taking the black young men who had been crippled by our society and sending them eight thousand miles away to guarantee liberties in Southeast Asia which they had not found in southwest Georgia and East Harlem.

So we have been repeatedly faced with the cruel irony of watching Negro and white boys on TV screens as they kill and die together for a nation that has been unable to seat them together in the same schools. So we watch them in brutal solidarity burning the huts of a poor village, but we realize that they would hardly live on the same block in Chicago. I could not be silent in the face of such cruel manipulation of the poor.”

April 4, 1968, one year to the day, MLK is assassinated

SCREENRick Smolan and Robyn Davidson: Making of Tracks
SCREENPedro E. Guerrero, a Photographer’s Journey
Frank Lloyd Wright
Alexander Calder
Louise Nevelson

HOMEWORK:
trailer Annie Leibovitz youtube
WATCH + POST:
Annie Leibovitz, Life Through a Lens: American photographer 
Available on Amazon: $2.99
STUDY: QUIZ #4 on Nov 19


WEEK 11 November 11: NO CLASS / VETERANS DAY

HOMEWORK:
WATCH + POST:
Watermark:
Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky
Available on Amazon: $2.99
QUIZ #4 will cover:
Rabbit Proof Fence Powerpoint
Mike Wilken’s Art, Culture & Anthropology presentation
The Sapphires
Wayne Blair Interview
Tony Briggs Interview
MLK’s “Beyond Vietnam” speech excerpt
Making of Tracks
Pedro Guerrero, a Photographer’s Journey
Frank Lloyd Wright
Alexander Calder
Louise Nevelson
Annie Leibovitz, Life Through a Lens
Watermark
, with Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky


WEEK 12 November 18
QUIZ #4 covers:
Rabbit Proof Fence Powerpoint
Mike Wilken’s 
The Sapphires
Wayne Blair Interview
Tony Briggs Interview
MLK’s “Beyond Vietnam” speech excerpt
Making of Tracks
Pedro Guerrero, a Photographer’s Journey
Frank Lloyd Wright

Alexander Calder
Louise Nevelson
Annie Leibovitz, Life Through a Lens
Watermark
, with Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky

FREE TICKETS: California’s American Indian and Indigenous Film Festival

For FREE tickets, you can stop by the CICSC: California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center in SBAB. If you can’t stop by the center you can email Megan Doughty at mdoughty@csusm.edu or call (760)707-3770
and Megan can sign you up for the nights you would like to attend.

Please note that she will need the following information from you to sign you up:

  • Days and screenings they would like to attend
  • First name, Last name
  • Student Email

SCREEN:
A Thousand Voices trailer: Thurs night with Irene Bedard: Narrator and actress in Smoke Signals)

From the proverb, “It takes a thousand voices to tell a single story,” this is a documentary that builds from thousands of voices to present one universal story of New Mexico’s Native American women. Native American women have been purveyors of culture since creation. In spite of Western invasions, Native American women remain strong and grounded in traditional values by enduring courage and wisdom. The voices and advisers are from the Navajo Nation, Mescalero Apache Tribe, Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Kiowa Tribe, Pueblo de Cochiti, Ohkay Owingeh, and Pueblos of Acoma, Laguna, Jemez, Santo Domingo, Pojoaque, Santa Clara, Taos, Nambe and San Ildefonso.

A Thousand Roads trailer: Thurs night with Chris Eyre, Director
The lives of four Native Americans take a significant turn as they confront the crises that arise in a single day.  A young Inupiat girl, a Navajo gangbanger, a Mohawk stockbroker, and a Quechuan healer journey through the epic landscapes of Alaska, New Mexico, Manhattan, and Peru, drawing strength from their tribal past to transcend the challenges of the day and embrace the promises that await them.

Chris Eyre

Smoke Signals trailer: this is your homework for Dec 02 class

All Trailers for Film Festival

Watermark student responses:
Kelsey Royer
Sara Bailey
Fabiola Beltran
Alana Stroud

. . . we are not satisfied and will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

mlk civil rights

The Making of Watermark

Edward Burtynsky: Ted Talks

Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz

“The misconception of totalitarianism is that freedom can be imprisoned. This is not the case. When you constrain freedom, freedom will take flight and land on a windowsill.”
— Ai Weiwei

The Chinese artist Ai Weiwei is internationally renowned for work that defies the distinction between art and activism. In this exhibition of new works created specifically for Alcatraz, Ai responded to the island’s layered legacy as a 19th-century military fortress, a notorious federal penitentiary, a site of Native American heritage and protest, and now one of America’s most visited national parks. Revealing new perspectives on Alcatraz, the exhibition raised questions about freedom of expression and human rights that resonated far beyond this particular place.

Ai Weiwei & MLK: see photos: bottom of page

Aaron Huey
Aaron Huey with Shepard Fairey: Honor the Treaties

HOMEWORK: ATTEND: California’s American Indian and Indigenous Film Festival and write and post about one of the films that you view. To count, the film must one of the feature films.


WEEK 13: November 25: no class meeting: Library Research Week: you will be watching two films at home
WATCH: Smoke Signals: 2.99 on Amazon, Free on Netflix streaming
WATCH: Ai Weiwei, Never Sorry: 2.99 on Amazon, Free on Netflix streaming


WEEK 14: December 02
DISCUSS: Alana Stroud
Annie Leibovitz and Pirelli Calendar: Huff Post
Annie Leibovitz and Pirelli Calendar: New York Times

DISCUSSCSUSM Native American Film Festival, Smoke Signals, Ai Weiwei

Student Blogs: Sophia’s recommendations
Ishi
Melissa Mandim

Ai Weiwei
Kelly Cohen
Ashley Nilssen

Smoke Signals:

Student Blogs: Deborah’s recommendation
Rabbit Proof Fence
Sophia Young

Sherman Alexie: Living Outside Borders
Smoke Signals written by Coeur D’Alene Sherman Alexie based on his short story collection “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven.”

Smoke Signals: Chapters 21-22
Music
Song Title: Wah Jhi Le Yihm. Album: Smoke Signals Sountrack by BC Smith and Forgive Our Fathers Suite by Ulali – another performance

Ulali (posts from YouTube link below): This song is in the Tutelo language… I had it translated by one of our speakers from home in NC. It’s an old pigeon dialect of our Old Siouan, Iroquois and coastal Algonquin people’s languages together.  All 3 of our big nations have lived together for thousands of years here in what is now the present Virginia and Carolina’s. This is a place that many nations migrated out of and went on traveling north, west and some more south and all over. An old hub!! Also this is a song for healing and giving back to the water and letting the water wash and clean and the spirit rise those are some of the words in the song. Wahjheeleh Yihm… means I carry you with me… So…it means let the water carry you… It’s an ancestral song for the dead and the water as the sacred source…where some of us put in the ashes as a return to be free spirit!! I wrote this song with the help of my cousin Jennifer and Soni. We are Ulali…

Poetry:
How do we forgive our fathers?
Maybe in a dream
Do we forgive our fathers for leaving us too often or forever when we were little?

Maybe for scaring us with unexpected rage or making us
nervous because there never seemed to be any rage there at all.

Do we forgive our fathers for marrying or not marrying our mothers?
For divorcing or not divorcing our mothers?
And shall we forgive them for their excesses of warmth or coldness?

Shall we forgive them for pushing or leaning, for shutting doors,
for speaking through walls, or never speaking, or never
being silent?

Do we forgive our fathers in our age or in theirs or in their
deaths, saying it to them or not saying it?
If we forgive our fathers, what else is left?

—Dick Lourie, “Forgiving Our Fathers”

Ai Weiwei and Alcatraz
re-education camps:
The largest group of Indian prisoners to be confined on Alcatraz were nineteen Hopi “hostiles.” Their crimes may have been the most unique in the 140-year history of incarceration on the Rock, they wouldn’t farm as the government instructed them to, and they opposed forced education in government boarding schools. Both “offenses” were part of widespread resistance to U.S. policies designed to erase Hopi language and religion.

Newspaper accounts talk about Hopi resistance to forced “education” (children were routinely beaten if they spoke Hopi or made any attempt to practice their religion), and of their refusal to farm the individual allotments of land established by a series of Indian agents (the commander-in-chief of the U.S. Army once wrote home that “There has been no branch of the government so corrupt and disgraceful to the Republic as that which has had the management of our Indian affairs.”

Alison Klayman: Director of Ai Weiwei
New York Times chief film critics A.O. Scott and Manohla Dargis named Alison one of their 20 Directors to Watch on a list of rising international filmmaking talents under 40. Her debut feature documentary, AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY, was shortlisted for an Academy Award, nominated for two Emmys, and earned Alison a Director’s Guild of America nomination. It premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival where it won a Special Jury Prize, and was picked up by IFC Films. NEVER SORRY has now been translated into over 26 languages and released theatrically around the world. It was also one of the highest grossing films of 2012 directed by a woman.

 

What a long way to come from Fall 2006, when Alison went to China fresh out of college on a trip meant to last five months. She traveled to places like Tibet and Taiwan, and began learning Mandarin Chinese. The underlying motive for travel was an aspiration to be a journalist and filmmaker.

After those first few months in China, Alison had a hunch that staying would be the best way to pursue her goals. She canceled her ticket home, and moved to Beijing to hone her language skills in the workplace. She answered a slew of online job ads and became an English coach on the set of a Jackie Chan/Jet Li film; wrote about basketball for the official 2008 Olympic website; voiced cartoons and made silicone dummies for a special effects studio.

By 2008, she was an accredited journalist and went on to produce radio and television feature stories for PBS Frontline, NPR’s “All Things Considered” and others. She also began shooting NEVER SORRY, following the artist/activist for three years and gaining unprecedented access to his life and work. 

Alison has made many media appearances to speak about her documentary work, including on The Colbert Report. She is a regular contributor to the New York Times’ Emmy-nominated Op-Doc Series, and a grant recipient of the Ford Foundation, Sundance Institute, Henry Luce Foundation, Jerome Foundation, Chicken and Egg Pictures and Britdoc. In 2011 she was a Sundance Creative Producing Fellow and one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film.” She continues to be a frequent guest speaker at major art museums and universities around the world. She graduated from Brown University in 2006 with an honors B.A. in History.

HOMEWORK: WATCH & POST
Waste Land, with Brazilian artist Vik Muniz: Free here: Environmental Film Festival;
Free on Netflix streaming;
In Cougar Courses

Quiz #5
Covers Everything we’ve studied since Quiz # 4, including
Ai Weiwei, Never Sorry
Smoke Signals
Edward Burtynsky Ted Talks

Jennifer Baichwal
Annie Leibovitz and Pirelli Calendar
“Sherman Alexi: Living Outside Borders” interview
Ulali
David Lourie
Ai Weiwei and Alcatraz
Alison Klayman
Wasteland
Lucy Walker: director of Wasteland



WEEK 15: December 09
QUIZ #5: Everyone must take Quiz #5: no one is excused from the final quiz

NOT ON THE QUIZ:
Arts 21
Cai Guo-Qiang: Ethereal Artworks . . . Smithsonian text
Falling back to earth
 12:45
Ninth Wave


 

 

 

 

 

One Comment

  1. Hello professor my name is Rayana. I was just wondering when you will post our grades and where i should be looking since we did not use cougar courses for this class…

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    Reply

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