Advanced Digital Arts Syllabus Spring 15

Writing-in-Progress
Advanced Digital Arts Syllabus Spring 2015

“A worthy subject is the most important discovery for artists—it’s the magnetic passion that burns at the core of their work, attracting or repelling us, and determining whether they will attempt to evoke what is deepest and highest in us.” —Artist Alex Grey, in Zig Zag Zen

“When you say the names of the  plants, you say the names of the gods.” —Ethnobotanist Timothy Plowman, quoted by Wade Davis in One River.

Flexibility is of utmost importance in the class. Please note that this syllabus is PROVISIONAL: ALWAYs check your email and the syllabus BEFORE class, especially on days with FIELDTRIPS. We will cancel field trips and meet in the classroom if the weather is overly challenging for us and/or our equipment.
PLEASE BE FLEXIBLE

Ash Thorp: CSUSM graduate: Ender’s game, etc: guest coming to CSUSM

FIVE lynda.com TUTORIALS for the class
InDesign CC Essential Training, David Blatner
Photoshop CC for Photographers: Fundamentals, Chris Orwig
Photoshop CC for Photographers: Intermediate, Chris Orwig
Lightroom 5 Essentials: Develop Module Basics, Chris Orwig
Lightroom 5 Essentials: Develop Module Advanced Techniques, Chris Orwig

The image below is a part of Alex Ingram’s WXNDER project: he’s a former CSUSM student:Ultimately what began as a series about escapism became a direct reflection toward the opposite. Rather than absconding oneself, the shift to finding oneself became ever present allowing the journey to take on new meaning through deep reflection – contemplating man’s connectivity to the cosmos, the meaning of life, manhood, and returning to the natural land.”—Alex Ingram

alex ingram sendtoalex
Possible Fieldtrip Sites, among others: always bring your DSLR’s and wear rugged and warm clothing that can get dirty: you will be on the ground.
Bring some snacks for yourself as well.
You’ll learn to identify poison oak and to walk mindfully. And to know what California smells like.
And you’ll learn to identify the plant that the Reese Witherspoon/Cheryl Strayed stops along to trail to breath in deeply in the film, Wild.
Please do not wander off from our group.

Close to CSUSM:
Double Peak Park
Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve
Daley Rancy
San Diego Botanic Gardens
Jack’s Pond?
Kit Carson Park
Felicitas Park

Further from CSUSM:
Torrey Pines State Park
San Elijo Lagoon
Santa Rosa Ecological Preserve
Self Realization Fellowship Hermitage & Meditation Gardens

WEEK 1 January 26
DISCUSS:
Introduce course requirements:
Waivers
Funes Digital Arts Competition: APRIL 2015: Required for arts majors: 3 winner receive $150

Final Book/Magazine Project ideas
The Book of Hours were medieval illuminated manuscripts. The Book of Magic Hours are illuminated photography books: when light is palpable, and backlighting renders everything luminous, magical.
Blurb:
Refueled magazine Issue 14
Refueled magazine Issue 13
What Liberty Ate magazine
Gabriela Iancu
Online Magazine Site for layout ideas

SCREEN: Relationship to Place in San Diego County: firescapes, wildlands, wetlands, wastelands, urban development, urban decay, urban-wild interfaces.
Alex Boyd: the Scottish landscape: website
Alex Boyd: short video
Alex Boyd: inspiration: painter Caspar David Friedrich

Post re: Rick Smolan: Inside Tracks featurette from the film Tracks, Robyn Davidson’s trek across the Australian outback

Post re: Heima
excerpt: the Icelandic landscape: we watched the first 20 minutes or so

HOMEWORK:
POST: what you consider to be your best work on your blog for the class to show next week
WATCH: Burtynsky’s Watermark (rent on amazon: click on link, or FREE streaming on Netflix) and write about particular images: why are they so compelling: composition, etc. Think about your own work and relationship to nature based on Burtynsky’s and Steffensen’s quotation below:

“If I look at 30 years of my work, I think the one constant throughout all of it is that because I understood what nature is, I’ve learned to understand what is there before we come, before we understand what is there before we come, before we change it. And for me not to have that profound relationship,I couldn’t do this work, because this work is lament for that loss.” Edward Burtynsky

“The reason why we should take that discussion seriously is because for the first time, we are not just passive watchers of what nature does, we are responsible.” J.P. Steffensen, from Greenland

BRING: your external hard drive with images to work on in Lightroom/Photoshop



WEEK 2 February 2
BLOGS:
Fieldtrips as our modern ceremonial exchange of information:
Post re: Chasing Wildflowers: “A Lake of Pure Sunshine” as a model for writing
Post re: Joshua Tree: Desolation Tango, Deanne Stillman, excerpt
LINK
BLOGS for your presentation of your writing about Watermark film

RESERVE a CAMERA and TRIPOD for next week’s field trip
SIGN WAIVERS
for field trips
Waiver/Field Trip Policy
Field Trips Responsibilities

DISCUSS:
Fieldtrip safety issues: poison oak, rattlesnakes, hiking gear, sunscreen, hat, proper shoes
Buddy system: do NOT wander away from the group
DOUPLE PEAK PARK

PRESENT: WATERMARK: your blog posts based on the homework assignment above

SCREEN:
Post re: Robert Adams: landscape photographer

His refined black-and-white photographs document scenes of the American West of the past four decades, revealing the impact of human activity on the last vestiges of wilderness and open space. Although often devoid of human subjects, or sparsely populated, Adams’s photographs capture the physical traces of human life: a garbage-strewn roadside, a clear-cut forest, a half-built house. An underlying tension in Adams’s body of work is the contradiction between landscapes visibly transformed or scarred by human presence and the inherent beauty of light and land rendered by the camera. Adams’s complex photographs expose the hollowness of the 19th Century American doctrine of Manifest Destiny, expressing somber indignation at the idea (still alive in the 21st Century) that the West represents an unlimited natural resource for human consumption. But his work also conveys hope that change can be effected, and it speaks with joy of what remains glorious in the West.

Post re: An-My Lê landscape photographer

An-My Le was born in Saigon, Vietnam in 1960. Lê fled Vietnam with her family as a teenager in 1975, the final year of the war, eventually settling in the United States as a political refugee. Her photographs and films examine the impact, consequences, and representation of war. Whether in color or black-and-white, her pictures frame a tension between the natural landscape and its violent transformation into battlefields. Suspended between the formal traditions of documentary and staged photography, Lê’s work explores the disjunction between wars as historical events and the ubiquitous representation of war in contemporary entertainment, politics, and collective consciousness.

Julieanne Kost photography

HOMEWORK:
1. Create a series of landscape photographs
 inspired by the work of An-My Le, Robert Adams, or Seth Boyd. Edit and enhance in Lightroom/and or Photoshop and post on our blog by next week’s class. In your post, please let us know what aspect of the artist you have chosen, has inspired you. This is to get you prepared for our outdoor photoshoot next week.

2. Bring DSLR cameras and tripods, reflectors, diffusers, snacks
 next week for our first field trip to Double Peak Park:MEET AT THE PARK at as close to 3pm as you can get there.



WEEK 3 February 9
FIELDTRIP: MEET AT 
Double Peak Park, 900 Double Peak Drive, San Marcos, CA 9207
Bring DSLR cameras and tripods, reflectors, diffusers, snacks
Dress appropriately: we will be there until sundown.
MAP from CSUSM to Double Peak Park

HOMEWORK:
EDIT and enhance photos from Double Peak Park. Post at least 10 on your blog. Please talk about your process, what you learned, what you might do differently, etc. Please use the tiled mosaic/carousel format so we can move through your images quickly. If you’re not sure what this is, we can help you repost your images at 5 on Monday night.
WATCH and Post about: Chasing Ice: free on streaming Netflix’ $2.99 on Amazon
Environmental photographer James Balog deploys time-lapse cameras to capture a record of the world’s changing glaciers, compressing years into seconds to illustrate how these ice mountains are disappearing at a breathtaking rate.



WEEK 4 February 16
T5i Manual at Canon website for download
T5i Manual
T2i Manual
CLASS:
1. We’ll look at your photos from Double Peak Park on your blogs up at the faculty computer at 3pm.
2. We’ll also look at your series of landscape photographs inspired by the work of An-My Le or Robert Adams from PBS Art 21, or Alex Boyd, the Scottish photographer, from your February 2 Homework.

DISCUSS:
1. Chasing Ice
2. Annenberg Space for Photography: choose a photographer to research from this site to inspire you for next week’s shoot at the Elfin Forest Reserve

3. Discuss shoot next week at Elfin Forest Reserve: Meet at the ELFIN FOREST INTERPRETIVE CENTER MAP:
The Interpretive Center is located at the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve (EFRR) on Harmony Grove Rd. between the communities of Harmony Grove and Elfin Forest.
8833 Harmony Grove Rd
Escondido, CA 92029

4. Simply Beautiful Exhibition at the Cannon Art Gallery in Carlsbad: a free exhibition
Upcoming Exhibitions: Simply Beautiful: Photographs from National Geographic
Feb. 22 – May 17, 2015
Reception: Saturday, Feb. 21 from 5-7 p.m.
Photographs from National Geographic will take visitors on a visual journey through variations on the universal theme of beauty. More than 50 images from National Geographic’s image collection will highlight everything from stunning landscapes and magnificent wildlife to captivating people and picturesque locales.
LOCATION: Carlsbad City Library complex, 1775 Dove Lane, Carlsbad, 92011
Tuesday through Saturday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Sunday: 1-5 p.m.
Announcement of the exhibition5. PHOTOGRAPHIC OPPORTUNITY ON CAMPUS with a most amazing photographer! I highly recommend!!!! that you attend this free event which has just fallen out of the sky (for us). I am taking my Tuesday class.

Photographer opportunityTuesday, Feb 24, 5:30-7
“Some of you might know Bartletti’s haunting work in the book “Enrique’s Journey” and in the L.A. Times.

He has now turned his lens to uncover both the deplorable conditions that workers in Mexican tomato fields are facing and how U.S. consumption of these crops continues this unfortunate cycle.
It is the first event in a semester long Food Justice series the CHABSS Engaging Diverse Dialogues and the Border Studies Program  is co-sponsoring with many other organizations.
Here are some links to his previous and current work.”—Fredi Avalos

Bartletti

HOMEWORK:
1.
Create a series of landscape photographs inspired by the work of a photographer you have researched at the Annenberg Space for Photography. Edit and enhance in Lightroom/and or Photoshop and post on our blog by next week’s class. In your post, please let us know what aspect of the artist you have chosen has inspired you. This will get you prepared for our outdoor photoshoot next week at the Elfin Forest Reserve.

2. Bring DSLR cameras, lenses, and tripods, reflectors, diffusers, SNACKS
 next week for our second FIELDTRIP to the Elfin Forest Reserve. DRESS WARMLY. We will meet as close to 3 pm as you can get there.

T5i Manual at Canon website for download
T5i Manual
T2i Manual



WEEK 5 February 23
FIELDTRIP: Elfin Forest Reserve: Meet at the ELFIN FOREST INTERPRETIVE CENTER MAP:
Elfin Forest Reserve: Meet at the ELFIN FOREST INTERPRETIVE CENTER MAP:
The Interpretive Center is located at the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve (EFRR) on Harmony Grove Rd. between the communities of Harmony Grove and Elfin Forest.
8833 Harmony Grove Rd
Escondido, CA 92029
Bring DSLR cameras, lenses, and tripods, reflectors, diffusers, SNACKS for our second field trip. DRESS WARMLY. We will meet as close to 3 pm as you can get there.

HOMEWORK:
EDIT AND ENHANCE photos from Elfin Forest Field Trip for Presentation, as well as your photo series inspired by your chosen Annenberg photographer: Be prepared to talk about your photographer



WEEK 6 March 2
CLASS:
1.
We’ll look at your photos from Elfin Forest on your blogs up at the faculty computer at 3pm.
2.
We’ll also look at your series of photographs inspired by the work of your photographer chosen from the Annenberg Space for Photography: you will speak about the relationship between what you learned from your photographer and your series of photos.
DISCUSS:
1. Final Book Project: create in Bookwright at blurb.com, in Lightroom Book Module, or in Indesign (if you already know the software):
We will review the Lightroom Book Module and take a look at Bookwright
A. Julieanne Kost: Creating and Publishing a Book in Lightroom 5
Also at ADObE TV
Julieanne Kost 2: Book Module

B. Lightroom 5 Essentials: 05 Creating Prints and Books with Chris Orwig: chapter 10

C. Bookwright in Blurb

2. Depth of Field: shallow and deep: how do we achieve this

HOMEWORK:
1. Shoot a Series of photographs: shoot images with a very shallow depth of field, and extremely sharp depth of field: variables: lens, distance from subject, and most importantly, aperture; how do these work together

2. Bring your DSLR cameras, lenses, and tripods, reflectors, diffusers, and SNACKS.DRESS WARMLY. We will meet at the San Diego Botanic Garden, Encinitas as close to 3 pm as you can get there.
map of the GARDEN : check out the WATERFALL and waterfall pond area, and the bamboo area and pond: These are spectacular, and especially after these RAINS!!
Downside is that it costs $10 for students, but you can go as early as you like to scout around for photos

Please get to the garden early if you can to walk around the garden to pick the best places to shoot.
The garden is stunning right now. Tons of blooms.
Make sure to google the location: it’s a pretty easy drive from school, 20 minutes or so.

I will be getting to the garden around 2, but I will be at the Gift Shop/Plant Shop at 3:20 if you want to meet up.
There are bathrooms there, and a snack shop.

WE WILL BE RETURNING TO CLASS AFTER THE SHOOT. Garden closes at 5

At class, I want to discuss our next two weeks in Kellogg Library for a studio shoot, and the Pechanga Reservation to visit the Giant Oak, etc.
Then you’ll have time to download your images and work on them.

 230 Quail Gardens Dr,
Encinitas, CA 92024
(760) 436-3036



WEEK 7 March 9:
1. POST
 your edited and Enhanced Photos from the March 2 assignment to your blogs

2. FIELDTRIP:
 San Diego Botanic Garden, Encinitas: remember to use what you learned re shallow and deep depth of field
Bring your DSLR cameras, lenses, and tripods, reflectors, diffusers, and SNACKS.DRESS WARMLY. We will meet as close to 3 pm as you can get there.
map of the GARDEN

Please get to the garden early if you can to walk around the garden to pick the best places to shoot.
The garden is stunning right now. Tons of blooms.
Make sure to google the location: it’s a pretty easy drive from school, 20 minutes or so.

I will be getting to the garden around 2, but I will be at the Gift Shop/Plant Shop at 3:20 if you want to meet up.
There are bathrooms there, and a snack shop.

3. WE WILL BE RETURNING TO CLASS AFTER THE SHOOT. Garden closes at 5

At class, I want to discuss our next two weeks in Kellogg Library for a portrait studio shoot with photographer Nancy diBenedetto as a guest lecturer, and the Pechanga Reservation to visit the Giant Oak, etc.
Discuss Final Book Project:
Create Book Project Proposal (minimum one page: 250 words) and post on your blog with accompanying photos by shooting a series of images that will help you to present your proposal. 
Here are some guidelines: please make sure to answer #2
a. Describe the proposed book project, including focus of book/theme and content of book, potential format (size), anticipated length: check out blurb.com for choices
b. Relevance of your project to your own life. Why have you chosen to your particular subject for your book project. How will you tell your story to make it compelling, memorable
c. How do you plan to find other artists who might help inspire your project, conceptually, aesthetically, technically.
d. How might research enhance your project
e. How will your book project enhance your learning and growth.
f. What do you anticipate you will learn from creating this project.

g. What do you want your viewer/reader to remember a year after looking at your book project.


Screen Shot 2015-03-09 at 8.51.55 AM

HOMEWORK
1. Write Final Book Proposal: see description above
2. Shoot a series of images
that will help you to accompany your book proposal
3. Edit and Enhance images from San Diego Botanic Garden photoshoot: post to blog



WEEK 8 March 16
STUDIO:
 MEET IN KELLOGG LIBRARY Studios for Portraits at 3pm:
BRING your DSLR cameras, tripods, any diffusers, filters and different lenses etc.
Photographer Nancy diBenedetto will be our Guest Lecturer today

Studio A – Kellogg 2316, 2314, 2315
Studio B – Kellogg 2311, 2312, 2313

BRING your DSLR cameras, tripods, any diffusers, filters and different lenses etc.
We will focus on these different types of lighting:
Rembrandt
Rembrandt lighting is so named because Rembrandt the painter often used this pattern of light in his paintings. Rembrandt lighting is identified by the triangle of light on the cheek. Unlike loop lighting where the shadow of the nose and cheek do not touch, in Rembrandt lighting they do meet, which creates that trapped little triangle of light in the middle.
To create proper Rembrandt lighting make sure the eye on the shadow side of the face has light in it and has a catch light, otherwise the eye will be “dead” and not have a nice sparkle. Rembrandt lighting is more dramatic, so like split lighting it creates more mood and a darker feel to your image.

Butterfly
Butterfly lighting is aptly named for the butterfly shaped shadow that is created under the nose by placing the main light source above and directly behind the camera. The photographer is basically shooting underneath the light source for this pattern. It is most often used for glamour style shots and to create shadows under the cheeks and chin. It is also flattering for older subjects as it emphasizes wrinkles less than side lighting.
Butterfly lighting is created by having the light source directly behind the camera and slightly above eye or head level of the subject (depends on the person). It is sometimes supplemented by placing a reflector directly under their chin, with the subject themselves even holding it! This pattern flatters subjects with defined or prominent cheek bones and a slim face. Someone with a round, wide face would look better with loop or even split to slim their face. This pattern is tougher to create using windowlight or a reflector alone. Often a harder light source like the sun or a flash is needed to produce the more defined shadow under the nose.

Broad Ligthing (similar to side lighting)
Broad lighting is when the subject’s face is slightly turned away from centre, and the side of the face which is toward the camera (is broader) is in the light. This produces a larger area of light on the face, and a shadow side which appears smaller. Broad lighting is sometimes used for “high key” portraits. This type of lighting makes a person’s face look broader or wider (hence the name) and can be used on someone with a very slim face to widen it. Most people however want to look slimmer, not wider, so this type of lighting would not be appropriate for someone who is heavier or round faced.
To create broad lighting the face is turned away from the light source. Notice how the side of the face that is towards the camera has the most light on it and the shadows are falling on the far side of the face, furthest from the camera. Simply put, broad lighting illuminates the largest part of the face showing.

Split lighting 
Split lighting is exactly as the name implies—it splits the face exactly into equal halves with one side being in the light, and the other in shadow. It is often used to create dramatic images for things such as a portrait of a musician or an artist. Split lighting tends to be a more masculine pattern and as such is usually more appropriate or applicable for men than it is for women (gendered lighting?).
Keep in mind, however, there are no hard and fast rules, so I suggest you use the information I provide here as a starting point or guideline. Until you learn this and can do it in your sleep, default to the guideline whenever you’re not sure.
To achieve split lighting simply put the light source 90 degrees to the left or right of the subject, and possibly even slightly behind their head. Where you place the light in relation to the subject will depend on the person’s face. Watch how the light falls on them and adjust accordingly. In true split lighting, the eye on the shadow side of the face does pick up light in the eye only. If by rotating their face a bit more light falls on their cheek, it’s possible their face just isn’t ideal for split lighting.
—Nancy diBenedetto  (thank you Nancy for this!!)

CLASS: After shooting in Library: VIEW Photos from San Diego Botanic Garden, Book proposals, and Book proposal shoot

HOMEWORK:
1. Edit and Enhance Photos from Portraits shot in library, and Post to Blog
2. BRING CAMERAS, tripods, etc for FIELDTRIP
FIELD TRIP PECHANGA GREAT OAK TREE
This field trip is REQUIRED for everyone.

We will meet at the Pechanga Gas Station, which is just beyond the Pechanga Casino.
45000 Pechanga Pkwy, Temecula, CA 92592
(please google for directions)
Everyone needs to be there by 3:45 PM. We will be getting on a Pechanga bus then. There is a good Mexican take-out restaurant at the gas station if you get there early. Inexpensive too. You can park in the parking lot behind the gas station, or any of the Casino parking lots, but park close to the gas station.

They will then have a small bus for us to visit the Great Oak and the Cove, where there’s a pond and traditional village structures: a giant acorn granary, cedar bark house, ramada, sweat. It’s really beautiful, set against the mountains.

Bring your charged DSLR cameras, tripods, etc. This will be a great photo shoot day.

Please remember we are guests of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. They are a sovereign nation. There is no public access unless you are invited onto the reservation. This is a great honor and privilege for us, as well as a great photo opportunity!

Please bring warm clothes. We’ll probably be outside until around 6:30 pm.

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 7.30.39 AM



WEEK 9 March 23
FIELD TRIP PECHANGA GREAT OAK TREE
This field trip is REQUIRED for everyone.
We will meet at the Pechanga Gas Station, which is just beyond the Pechanga Casino.
45000 Pechanga Pkwy, Temecula, CA 92592
(please google for directions)

Everyone needs to be there by 3:45 PM. We will be getting on a Pechanga bus then. There is a good Mexican take-out restaurant at the gas station if you get there early. Inexpensive too. You can park in the parking lot behind the gas station, or any of the Casino parking lots, but park close to the gas station.

They will then have a small bus for us to visit the Great Oak and the Cove, where there’s a pond and traditional village structures: a giant acorn granary, cedar bark house, ramada, sweat. It’s really beautiful, set against the mountains.

Bring your charged DSLR cameras, tripods, etc. This will be a great photo shoot day.

Please remember we are guests of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. They are a sovereign nation. There is no public access unless you are invited onto the reservation. This is a great honor and privilege for us, as well as a great photo opportunity!

Please bring warm clothes. We’ll probably be outside until around 6:30 pm.

The Great Oak
The Great Oak is the largest natural-growing, indigenous coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia ) wi’aashal tree in the United States and is estimated to be anywhere from 850 to 1,500 years old, making it one of the oldest oak trees in the world. The tree has been used by countless generations as a gathering place. The Great Oak area, Wi’aasha, is home to numerous culturally sensitive, historical and archaeological sites, including tribal interment sites from time immemorial.

The ancient Great Oak is a living, growing entity. An environmental wonder that continues to branch out, its roots continue to expand to keep it standing. When approaching the tree from a distance, what appear to be smaller trees around a larger tree are really the whole tree’s heavy spreading beams laying on the ground and rising up again in a circle of growth. The dark foliage has provided countless generations with welcome shade from the hot summer sun. In the center is the massive trunk, which is 20 feet around. Each branch, larger than most live oak trunks, rises up 96 feet, comes down to rest on the ground, and then rises up again to form the outer canopy. For all those fortunate enough to see it, the Great Oak truly is an impressive sight.

HOMEWORK:
1. Edit and Enhance photos from Pechanga Reservation Fieldtrip and Post to Blog
2. Create a series of photos, landscapes, portrait at a site (your choice) in the region for your books. The photos should tell a story that assists in the telling of the larger story for your book.



WEEK 10 March 30: SPRING BREAK
Shoot images for your Books
Work on your books in Bookwright or Lightroom Book Module



WEEK 11 April 6
CLASS:
DISCUSS:
entries for Funes Digital Arts Competition, with 3 prize winners ($100 each) and online submissions: Our TA Julius Williams is in charge of the contest.

We will VIEW
1.Photos from Pechanga Fieldtrip
and from
2. Photo Series based on your work for your books (from homework above (Create a series of photos, landscapes, and/or portraits at a site (your choice) in the region for your books. The photos should tell a story that assists in the telling of the larger story for your book).
3. REMINDER: Books must be COMPLETED and sent to Blurb at the end of class on April 20



WEEK 12 April 13
DISCUSS & SELECT:  
FUNES DIGITAL ARTS COMPETITION photos: make a Collection in Lightroom or a folder for your 300 high-resolution jpeg images: you can submit up to three;
remember to use 300 dpi for high resolution jpegs when you export your images.
DISCUSS:
sizes for the Description Box
POST:
post your three selected images on your blog: if you can’t decide, post your favorites and allow the class give you advice, which you can take or not

VIEW: your work in progress on your final Book Project, especially from those who have not shown us photos for their books
I will talk to each of you individually about your progress, as book must be uploaded to blurb next week

HOMEWORK:
Work on finishing books to upload on Monday: see coupon code below.
Select e images for Funes Digital Arts Competition to upload on Monday



WEEK 13 April 20
Screen Shot 2015-04-17 at 10.06.46 AM
FINISH & UPLOAD
: Final Book Project and submit to blurb by end of evening

UPLOAD: 3 images to the Submission Portal for the
Funes Digital Arts Competition: funes.csusm.edu

Upload at:  funes.csusm.edu

Size of longest side must not exceed 24 inches. You will enter the size of your image in the submission portal’s description box when you upload; for example. 16 x 24;   12 x 18;    24 x 24

Submission format: 300 dpi high resolution jpeg. Please include a title and your name in the file name; for example:  landscape2_ansel_adams.jpg  or  portrait3_annie_leibovitz

Information sheet PDF:  FUNES_Competition_info1

Remember to post your Funes Digital Arts Competition photos on your blog

HOMEWORKfinal post: post the 12 strongest images from the semester to present to the class

TIMELINE FOR BLOG POSTS

Week 1
In-class post: Heima, Icelandic Musicians and Landscape
In-class post: Inside Tracks: Rick Smolan, photographer

Week 2
Post re Watermark
Inclass writing:
In-class post: “Chasing Wildflowers”
In-class post: “Joshua Tree: Desolation Tango”
In-class post: Robert Adams
In-class post: An-My Le

Week 3
Landscape photos inspired by An-My Le, Robert Adams, or Seth Boyd

Week 4
Post: Double Peak Park Fieldtrip photos: 10

Week 5
Post: Chasing Ice

Week 6
Post: Elfin Forest photos
Post: Annenberg Space photographer for inspiration

Week 7
Post: Shallow and deep depth of field photo series

Week 8
Post: San Diego Botanic Garden Fieldtrip photos
Post: Final Book Proposal, with images to accompany book proposal

Week 9
Post: Portrait shoot in Library with Nancy diBenedetto

Week 10
Spring Break

Week 11
Post: Pechanga Reservation Fieldtrip photos

Week 12
Post: Photo Series based on your work for your books

Week 13
Post: Funes Digital Arts Competition submissions: 3 photos

Week 14
Post: 12 strongest images for the semester
All posts complete for the semester for blog

Week 15
Funes Competition Celebration and Final book presentation



WEEK 14 April 27
See Blog TIMELINE above at the end of April 20
BLOG MUST BE COMPLETE: final post: 
post the 12 strongest images from the semester to present to the class

ADD: WE WILL DO THIS IN CLASS to add your books to your blogs as a blurb slideshow
1. go to book in blurb: go to: my dashboard
2. set book up for sale
3. go to preview once all that is done and go to share
4. go to embed
5. go to copy for word press, click copy
6. return to your word press site and create new post
7. change tab from visual to HTML, paste into the field CMD+V
8. post as normal
HOMEWORK:
POTLUCK
: Please remember to bring something to Share
BRING: Your Printed Books/Magazines



WEEK 15 May 4
POTLUCK: Arts 346:  Please Bring something to SHARE
BRING: PRINTED BOOKS: Final Magazine/Book Project presentations. If you are in two classes of mine, please bring both books to share




NOTES
Study contemporary photographers who explore the global  “industrial sublime,” as well as photographers who explore are regional ecosystems in California and Baja
Wild, the movie

BJornson: experimental nature
David Maisel: aerial/industrial sublime

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