My birding friend, Maggie Jaffe, identified this beauty as a Baltimore oriole, but plant gathering friend, Lydia Vassar, wrote that she thinks it’s a Bullock’s oriole (see comment below). I photographed it while gathering/photographing chia in a burn area off highway 79 in Riverside County. Maggie was in the midst of moving, and all of her birding books were packed, so luckily Lydia had access to hers.

Last year Maggie, an incredibly accomplished poet, won a hefty and well-deserved National Endowments for the Arts award for her extraordinary poetry collection, FLIC[K]S, POETIC INTERROGATIONS OF AMERICAN CINEMA,

poems that brilliantly investigate the dark political legacy of American cinema, from Cat People to Thelma and Louise. “Jaffe[‘s] . . . film poems [are] offered as proof that movies are . . . capitalist fairytales in the Brothers Grimm sense, the truth at its most enormous, and wearing its most terrifying shoes, jack boots, under its petticoats.”—Michael McIrvin.

I’ve written about gathering fieldtrips and posted photos of Lydia a zillion times, so won’t write more here except to say she to is extraordinary. See lastest post about her and her basket weaving demonstration at CSUSM on September 21.

Posted by deborah small

2 Comments

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  2. Our bird book from the 1950’s call this a bullock’s oriele, we have quite a few here in our yard in the spring, both males and females, they are from the baltimore oriole family, but bullock’s are the ones here in the west.

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