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Native Plants Class: Contemporary and Traditional Uses at IdyllwildARTS 2014

IDYLLWILD 2014 SUMMER ARTS FLYEROnce again, Craig Torres, Barbara Drake, Abe Sanchez, and Leslie Mouriquand will be teaching their wonderful week-end workshop on Native Plants at IdyllwildARTS, July 5 & 6 2014.
The poster above and bios below are from the IdyllwildARTS website.

CRAIG TORRES (Tongva) is a member of the Traditional Council of Pimu and involved with Ti’at Society, an organization focused on the revival of the traditional maritime culture of the Southern California coastal region and Southern Channel Islands. He is an artist, as well as cultural educator, presenter and consultant to schools, culture and nature centers, museums, and city, state and government agencies acting as a consultant on the Tongva. He has also been involved with the organization Preserving Our Heritage and Chia Café, which provide cooking demos and classes with California native plants. These activities also provide education on the importance of preserv- ing native plants, habitats and landscapes for future generations.

BARBARA DRAKE (Tongva) is a tribal elder and culture keeper. Her program, Preserving Our Heritage, is a food bank of native foods collected, preserved and processed for tribal elders. She is a member of the Mother Earth Clan, a group of three Southern California Native American women educators who have taught extensively in muse- ums, schools and tribal institutions.

ABE SANCHEZ has been actively involved in the revival and preservation of Indigenous arts and foods. Two of his specialties are Southern California Native American Basketry and California and Southwest Native foods. He has had the opportunity to work closely with traditional Native American gatherers to learn the methods and practices of these cultural specialists. His interest in traditional foods is that many of these local ingredients are sustainable products that are readily available yet underutilized. He believes that by having the opportunity to teach about these ancient natural foods and helping people learn ways to prepare and eat them again can make a difference in both their health and our environment.

DANIEL MCCARTHY received his BS and MS in anthropology from the University of California, Riverside. For the past 40 years, he has worked at Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Joshua Tree National Park and throughout Southern California compiling photographic inventories of rock art sites in these areas and throughout the western region. He has worked with Elders and Traditional Practitioners for over 35 years and served as the Tribal Relations Program Manager for the San Bernardino National Forest for 17 years. He is currently Director, CRM Department, at San Manuel Band of Mission Indians.

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Seri Facepainting Preparation for Xipe Projects Gallery Cultural Exchange

The Seri/Comca’ac Womens Artisans Cooperative members prepare for the celebration and sale of their artwork at the XIPE PROJECTS Museum in Huntington Beach, CA. They are applying their facepaint in the home of master basket weaver Abe Sanchez, who is helping to host them during their visit to the U.S. from Desemboque, Sonora, Mexico.

The elegant and often intricate facepainting designs are applied for ceremonies, celebrations, markets, and fiestas. Historically, facepaint was applied “as protection from the sun, for purely aesthetic or decorative purposes, for curative and supernatural purposes, and to influence nature,” according to Richard Felger and Mary Beck Moser in their People of the Desert and Sea.

More images of our Seri friends can be found here.

Xipe Projects Group Photo

Xipe Projects Group Photo

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Seri/Comca’ac Women’s Artisans Cooperative Thursday, Nov 7 at Xipe Projects Gallery


Seri Poster
From XIPE PROJECTS: Greetings Friends!
This is a quick note to remind you that on  Thursday, November 7, between 3PM and 9PM, Xipe Projects will host the Seri/Comca’ac Women’s Artisans Cooperative from Desemboque and Punta Chueca on the Sea of Cortez in Sonora, Mexico.
 
The talented artisans will be singing, dancing, and demonstrating their craft at the Xipe Projects exhibition hall and works on sale will include traditional coiled baskets, ironwood carvings, and shell and fishbone necklaces made from native materials gathered in the Sonoran Desert and the Sea of Cortez.
 
Confirmed participants include Ms. Angelita Torres, the iconic “Angel Woman” featured in the photography of Graciela Iturbide and Mr. Abe Sanchez, an artist and promoter for the Revitalization of Indigenous Arts and Foods.
 
Guest speakers include Mike Gray and Jim Lindell and there will be an image presentation designed by Deborah Small.
 
Join us for a unique cultural experience and the opportunity to purchase these crafts directly from the artists themselves.
 
The event is scheduled to take place at the Xipe Projects gallery at 15121 Graham Street, Suite 103, Huntington Beach, CA. Accepted forms of payment will be cash and personal check. All proceeds directly support the Women’s Artisans Cooperative.
 
Refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres will be served and parking and admission are free.
 
For directions or more information about the Seri Cooperative, please contact us via email at  staff@xipeprojects.com or visit us at  www.xipeprojects.comWe hope to see you there! ¡Hasta luego!
 
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Last Week for Cultural Revitalization Exhibition

The Native American Cultural Revitalization in San Diego County Exhibition closes this Friday, Nov 1. We hope you can see the installation during this final week at:
Escondido Arts Partnership Muncipal Gallery
HOURS
:
11-5  Tuesday
11-4  Thursday, Friday
LOCATION:
262 East Grand Avenue
Corner of Grand and Juniper
Escondido, CA 92025   (760) 480-410

The images below are from a slideshow that is a part of the installation. More images of the installation are included in earlier posts and here.

avellaka_acorn

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Installation of Cultural Revitalization Exhibition

Wendy Wilson, Director of the Escondido Arts Partnership Muncipal Gallery, took these photos of our CULTURAL REVITALIZATION installation.

Escondido Arts Partnership Muncipal Gallery
HOURS
:
11-5  Tuesday
11-4  Thursday, Friday, Saturday
LOCATION:
262 East Grand Avenue
Corner of Grand and Juniper
Escondido, CA 92025   (760) 480-410

More Photos of CULTURAL REVITALIZATION HERE

AVELLEKA GRID

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Seri/Comca’ac Women Artisans’ Cooperative

On November 7, basket weaver Abe Sanchez is helping to host basket weavers from the Seri/Comca’ac Women’s Artisans Cooperative from Desemboque and Punta Chueca on the Sea of Cortez in Sonora, Mexico, along with XIPE PROJECTS, a museum and non-profit educational foundation.

SERI INDIAN CULTURAL EXCHANGE AND MARKETPLACE
November 7th, 3-9 PM

XIPE PROJECTS is pleased to announce the launch of their first annual Seri
cultural exchange and Indian marketplace.

On November 7th 2013, between 3PM and 9PM, Xipe Projects will host the
Seri/Comca’ac Women’s Artisans Cooperative from Desemboque and Punta
Chueca on the Sea of Cortez in Sonora, Mexico. The talented artisans will
be demonstrating their craft at the Xipe Projects exhibition hall and works on
sale will include traditional coiled baskets, ironwood carvings, and shell and
fishbone necklaces made from native materials gathered in the Sonoran Desert
and the Sea of Cortez.

Confirmed participants include Ms. Angelita Torres, the iconic “Angel Woman”
featured in the photography of Graciela Iturbide, and Mr. Abe Sanchez, an artist
and promoter for the Revitalization of Indigenous Arts and Foods.

Join us for a unique cultural experience and the opportunity to purchase these
crafts directly from the artists themselves.

The event is scheduled to take place at the Xipe Projects gallery at 15121
Graham Street, Suite 103, Huntington Beach, CA. Accepted forms of payment
will be cash and personal check. All proceeds directly support the Women’s
Artisans Cooperative.

Refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres will be served and parking and
admission are free.

For directions or more information about the Seri Cooperative, please contact
us via email at staff@xipeprojects.com or check out our website at

http://www.xipeprojects.com/

We hope to see you there! Hasta luego!”

Raquel Hoeffer gathering cardon cactus fruits

The image above is Raquel Hoeffer, a Seri basket weaver, gathering the pitahaya, the delicious fruits of the cardón cactus, in Desemboque on the Sea of Cortez. The cardón, or Pachycereus pringlei, is the largest cactus in the Sonoran Desert, and the entire cactus is important to the Seri for food, medicine, material, and ceremony.

“The XIPE PROJECTS will be hosting the craftswomen of Comca’ac /Seri Women’s Artisan’s Cooperative, who will display and sell the crafts for which the Seri have become internationally known.

We would be delighted to have you share this festive occasion with us. There will be fabulous food, wonderful talk, and great things to see and buy.

As many of you may know, the Seri are an indigenous group in Sonora, Mexico, just across the Sea of Cortez from Baja California. To a great extent they continue to maintain their traditional way of life, despite the difficulties posed by modern civilization.

Their numbers, however, are dwindling, and they are mired in poverty. Despite these difficulties, the Seri women continue to weave their traditional baskets, beautiful examples of the basketmaker’s art.

The baskets are made in time-honored ways, completely from materials native to the Seri lands and the adjoining Sea of Cortez. The women also make fascinating jewelry, much of it crafted from maritime materials.

These things will be on display and for purchase at Xipe, in addition to the sleek, strikingly beautiful ironwood carvings, a more recently developed craft of the Seri. We are honored to be able to host the Seri and to help in our small way the survival of their crafts and their culture.

Abe Sanchez and Mike Gray will also be there, happy to help answer any questions about the Seri art, culture, and way of life. Join us on November 7th!

We thank you for your continued support!”

Sincerely,
Peter Markman, Director, XIPE PROJECTS

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Cultural Revitalization Exhibition now open

Native American CULTURAL REVITALIZATION in San Diego County Exhibition is now open.
PLEASE SEE the POST BELOW THIS ONE FOR MORE IMAGES from the exhibition.
Escondido Municipal Arts Gallery:
HOURS: 11-4:  TU, THUR, FRI, SAT
CLOSED:  SUN, MON, WED
LOCATION: 262 East Grand Avenue
Corner of Grand and Juniper
Escondido, CA 92025   (760) 480-410

Makayla McKewan yerba mansa bladderpod

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EXHIBITION: Cultural Revitalization: Oct 12

WHAT: Native American CULTURAL REVITALIZATION in San Diego CountyOur exhibition focuses on the revitalization of Native American cultural traditions through the sustainable use of local native plants, storytelling, and basket weaving. 
WHERE: 
Escondido Municipal Art Gallery, 262 East Grand Avenue; Escondido, CA
WHEN: 
Opening: October 12; 5:30-8:00 pm
COLLABORATORS: Lydia Vassar, Cathleen Chilcote Wallace, Deborah Small, Bryan Endress
We hope to see you there!

The photos below are part of the exhibition. I shot them in October 2012 at the Yawáywish Girls Conference hosted by the La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians, where young women from regional tribes learned to make open-weave juncus baskets with Luiseño basket weaver Lydia Vassar and Cahuilla basket weaver Tangie Bogner. Cathleen Chilcote Wallace was the Luiseño story teller for the conference. Please click on any of the images below to enlarge them.

Basket weavers work extensively with plants, because in southern California, it is plants that make the culture possible—as food, fiber, cordage, clothing, tools, shelter, fuel, weapons, musical instruments, medicine, and ceremony.  It is through storytelling that these cultural traditions are preserved and passed to future generations.

Recognized as the most important tool in the technological repertoire of California Indians, baskets shaped every aspect of native culture and were critical for survival. Women wove the seed beaters, harvesting baskets, winnowing trays, burden baskets, cooking baskets, storage baskets, granaries, cradle-board baskets, as well as intricately woven gift and ceremonial baskets. Some of their houses and ramadas, essentially large woven baskets, were woven by the men in the village along with the fish traps and fishing nets.

In the photos above, the young women are weaving with Juncus textilis, one of the four most important southern California basketry plants. Two hundred twenty-five species of juncus are found worldwide, but the Juncus textilis the weavers are using is endemic to California.

Other parts of our exhibition focus on storytelling, and on edible and medicinal native plants in our region.

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